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My Jewish Bessarabian Roots (Vaysman)

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  My Jewish Bessarabian Roots
  
  
  By Ella Romm
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  San Diego, California, 2019
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  ISBN 978-1-300-62108-9
  љ Romm Ella, 2013 Contents
  Chapter 1. Introduction 5
  About the Author 5
  How It All Started 6
  Sourcing the Data 7
  How It Worked (Finding the People) 7
  Concerns and Problems in the Research 10
  Geography of the Vaysman Family 11
  Names and Their Metamorphosis 14
  Chapter 2. The Family Tree 19
  Our Early Ancestors 19
  Descendants of Gersh Vaysman 24
  Descendants of Mendel Vaysman 44
  Descendants of Hoskel Vaysman 59
  Descendants of Rosya Vaysman 76
  Descendants of Azriel Vaysman 93
  Descendants of Velvel Vaysman 98
  Chapter 3. Family Memoirs 99
  Before the World War II 99
  War Stories 108
  Chapter 4. Family Statistics 125
  Birth Statistics 125
  Lively Statistics 128
  Statistics of Death 130
  Marriage and Procreation Statistics 132
  The Final Thoughts 134
  
  
  
  
  
  To my father Yuliy Vaysman
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  Foreword
  
  This is the second edition of the Vaysman family tree book originally published by me in 2013. There were a few white sports in that research. Since then, I was able to find more information, and the tree is finally complete. I found Raphael Weisman, and learnt about a lost branch of Wolf Vaysman who immigrated to South Africa at the turn of the 20th century. Silvia Spoliansci (Gersh Vaysman descendant) contacted me from Germany after reading the book. Susan Weis from Argentina similarly found me, and she provided some information about another lost, as I thought, branch of Samuel Weisman (Azriel Vaysman descendant). I found Katelyn Michelle Richmond on ansectry.com as my distant cousin. She is a descendant of Haskel Vaysman (Hershel Vaysman (White). Instead of statistics, that is rather out of date, I added beautiful photos, which I collected from different relatives, whom I gladly thank for that.
  
  Chapter 1. Introduction
  About the Author
  
  Dear friends, family and all readers,
  
  My name is Ella Romm. My maiden name is Vaysman. I was born in 1966, in a small Russian town of the Rostov-on-Don region, named Sholokhovskiy. My father Yuliy Vaysman relocated to Sholokhovskiy from Kishinev, Moldova, where he was born, spent his childhood and early adulthood together with many other Vaysmans. In 1993, my family immigrated to the United States. I had been living in New York for 15 years and then moved to San Diego, California in 2007. I am a medical doctor, a poet, a researcher.
  
  The subject of my latest research that started in 2010 is the Vaysman family ancestry along with the Bessarabian Jewish heritage. This book is a summary of how and what I was able to dig on the subject. Working on the book, I not only brought to light the life of our ancestors, but also met interesting people, restored lost connections and made many friends. I became deeply attached to every person in the family tree, no matter living or dead long time ago, met in the past or will not be seen ever. In the process, a terrific family reunion was held on October 26, 2012 in HodHaSharon, Israel where more than 70 people came together.
  
  Some data in this book can be incorrect. I would appreciate any amendments and additions sent to me by the readers.
  
  My address is queenstory@gmail.com. You can also find me on Facebook as Ella Romm Vaysman.
  
  My family history is a precious jewel I possess and want to share with you.
  
  
  How It All Started
  
  Vaysman family tree I built on ancestry.com includes more than 4500 people. Not all of them related by blood, of course, but rather by marriages. More than 300 of them are related by blood.
  
  It all began with my father"s memoirs that I wrote down and published on Internet. His mother, Anne Vaysman (Meites), whose family stories were recorded on tape long time ago, in turn, inspired my father. Thanks to these stories, I knew there were four siblings on the top of the family pyramid: Mendel, Hoskel, Azriel and the sister Anerosya.
  My family was descendants of Mendel, so it was not hard to build that part of the tree. Usually this is where people stop their research. I had a desire to dig deeper. I learned that Azriel"s children went to Australia, Hoskel"s to Argentina and USA and Anerosya"s to Israel. I was also aware that Azriel had a son Pinya, Anerosya had five children, among them Kenya, Gersh and Shimon, and Hoskel was visiting his children in America. I discovered another brother Volf, who ended up in South Africa. I did not have any accurate data, rough dates of birth were unreliable, and the only fact I had known for sure was that Vaysman family lived in Kishinev. Anyway, I started.
  
  
  Sourcing the Data
  
  It is perhaps fascinating that I never used any paid people search services actively advertised online, and so far had not spent a penny on my research. Normally I collect data free of charge from these web sites:
  
  ancestry.com
  geni.com
  myheritage.com
  jewishgen.org
  odnoklassniki.ru
  yadvashem.org
  facebook.com
  peoplesmart.com
  
  People"s private information has become widely available with the advent of the Internet. I easily collected names, birthdays and places of residence. I copied pictures, learned about the number of children in the families without breaking the law, without asking anybody for information.
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  How It Worked (Finding the People)
  
  Not everything was as easy as it sounds, of course. I had too little information to start with. The major breakthrough happened when I discovered the Yad Vashem site with the database of Shoah victims" names.
  
  Yad Vashem is the Israel's official memorial to the Jewish victims of the Holocaust (Shoa in Hebrew), established in 1953. To my great surprise, all three Vaysman brothers, Mendel, Hoskel and Azriel, were listed in their records.
  
  Source:
  Pages of Testimony
  Last Name:
  Vaisman
  First Name:
  Azriel
  First Name:
  Moshe
  Father's First Name:
  Eliyahu
  Mother's First Name:
  Rakhel
  Gender:
  Male
  Date of Birth:
  1880
  Place of Birth:
  Kishinev, Bessarabia
  Marital Status:
  MARRIED
  Spouse's First Name:
  Sima
  Permanent Place of Residence:
  Kishinev, Bessarabia
  Place during the war:
  Kishinev, Bessarabia
  Place of Death:
  Kishinev, Bessarabia
  Date of Death:
  1944
  At age:
  64
  Submitter's Last Name:
  Vaisman
  Submitter's First Name:
  Pinchas
  Relationship to victim:
  SON
  
  
  Yad Vashem collects data mostly provided by the victims" relatives. Their testimonials gave me the incredible information not only about the victims but also about ther families. Let us look at the Azriel"s son Pinchas testimonial.
  
  
  This document gave me not only Azriel"s date of birth but also the names of his parents and wife. The original document also pointed to the Pinchas" address in Australia confirming that Azriel"s descendants moved there. Then I just needed some luck. To get in contact with Azriel"s son Pinchas I emailed the Jewish Holocaust Center in Melbourne where the testimonial was filed. I have never got an answer. Not sure if Pinchas was still alive and puzzled by how to proceed with my search, I went to odnoklassniki.ru, a famous Russian social network for the former classmates. There I found 14 Vaysmans living in Melbourne and wrote a letter to each one of them. How lucky! I got a response from two brothers Semen and Michael, seemingly Azriel"s grandsons!
  
  The other main breakthrough happened when I found Hoskel"s profile on myheritatage.com and wrote a letter to his granddaughter Annette Lustgarten, the originator of his record in her family tree. I cannot express how exiting it was when she replied confirming our relationship. She told me about relatives in Argentina and USA and provided with valuable information on them. The tree was growing! In the same period, I found more evidence on Yad Vashem. I stumbled upon Shmiel and Gersh Vaysman"s testimonial about their relatives perished in Holocaust. There were home addresses of both of them. I placed the data of the people of interest on one of the Israeli forums, and with help of other researchers got their phone numbers. In the beginning, I was very shy to make a call, so I asked my father for help. He called Ester Vaysman in Israel and, to his astonishment, she was the one he uses to play with as a child in Kishinev. They talked, and talked, and talked... Ester and her daughter Eugenia helped me in finding the Anerosya"s descendants.
  
  Now I am in contact with families all around the world. I am thanking all of you who took any part in building the tree. My special thanks to Yuliy Vaysman (USA), Annette Lustgarten (USA), Ester Koyfman and her daughter Eugenia Itzhack (Israel), Maya Nave and her husband Shlomo (Israel), Rosita Glyukman and her father Vladimir Shor (Israel), Ruth Vaisman (Argentina), Semen Vaysman (Australia), Shneir Vaysman (Israel), Elik Kamisher (Israel), Stella Kanchik (Israel), Anna Fudman and her son Baruch (Israel), Julia Bustos (Argentina), Biana Shapiro (Israel), Eva Chistova (Russia), Raphael Weisman (South Africa), Silvia Spoliansci (Germany) and Sarita Froimovici (Argentina) for their help and support. The listing could continue but I would just like to thank all those who helped in my research! I also want to pay my deep respect to Gersh Vaysman, Pinchas Vaysman, Shmiel Vaysman and Ida Gabeva. Unfortunately, they are not with us anymore but they had left the information on Yad Vashem in the past so I was able to bring everybody together.
  
  Concerns and Problems in the Research
  
  I can divide my research in two main parts. The easier but also time-consuming part was surfing the web in getting any hints about the relatives. Almost every week I discovered new evidence, new data, or a new person. The other part was talking to the people I found and getting information from them, or confirming the data I already had. I was lucky to become friends with some newly found relatives. They were interested in learning about their past, or just willing to make a connection. Yet most of the people were resistant to any form of communication. Some even doubted our relationship. My letters were often left unanswered, and the communication attempts failed. I was getting frustrated and upset and at times wanted to stop the project. However, I always went back with reassurance and support of my husband Michael Romm who believed in my research and me. Michael offered me help in translation, correcting grammar, and creating graphics for this book. Over time, I grew less sensitive to rejection and more focused on my project itself.
  
  Geography of the Vaysman Family
  It was the common believe among relatives that Vaysmans settled in Kishinev long time ago.
  
  Today Kishinev is the capital and the largest city of the Republic of Moldova. However, throughout its history the city belonged to a number of counties. Since its foundation in 1436 it was a part of the Principality of Moldavia under the suzerainty of the Ottoman Empire; from 1812 to 1918 - the capital of Bessarabia, a province of Russia; from 1918 to 1940 - a provincial town of Romania; from 1940 to 1991 - a capital of Moldavian Republic of the USSR.
  
  In this book, I will use Moldova instead of Bessarabia or Romania all the time for the consistency and statistics. I also will use Kishinev without mentioning of the country.
  
  Working with the metric certificates, I found that not Kishinev but another Bessarabian city was our family"s place of origin. All our early ancestors were born in Bendery, lived there through the childhood and moved to Kishinev as adults.
  
  Bendery, also known as Tighina, is located on the western bank of the river Dniester in the historical region of Bessarabia. Most likely Jews came there from Romania and, more precisely, the place called Transnistria.
  
  Vaysmans moved from Bendery to Kishinev in the beginning of the 20 century. Kishinev was a quickly growing provincial capital and could provide better business opportunities as well as the quality of life. For example, my great-grandfather Mendel Vaysman was a resident of Kishinev in 1907 according the Bessarabian Duma Voters List.
  
  Name:
  Mendel Vaysman
  Patronym:
  Elev
  At age at Vote:
  at least 24
  Year of Record:
  1907
  Gender:
  Male
  Country:
  Moldova
  Gubernia (District):
  Bessarabia
  Town:
  Kishinev
  [Chisinau]
  Voting Qualification:
  Tenant (rents an apartment and pays apartment tax)
  Data Source:
  Romania - Bessarabia Duma Voters List
  
  Life in Bendery and later in Kishinev was not easy. The brutality of pogroms, Soviet repressions, the World War II combined with anti-Semitism forced Vaysmans to emigrate. Only few families are still left in Russia and Moldova, as far as I know.
  
  Presently descendants of our family reside all around the globe, mostly in Israel, USA, Argentina and Australia, but also in Germany, Canada, South Africa, England and Spain.
  
  Prior to the 20th century, all the people from our tree were born in Bessarabia, now Moldova. Then immigration started in the first quarter of the 20th century. The role of Moldova in our family growth was slowly diminishing, until no births in the 21st century.
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  Names and Their Metamorphosis
  Having a last name was atypical for a Jew prior to the late 18th and the beginning of the 19th century. The common practice was to call a person by his or her first name plus the father"s first name on the ritual occasions. For example, Gersh"s son Eliyahu would be called Eliyahu ben-Gersh and his sister Ester would be called Ester bat-Gersh. Such "last names" were one-generational.
  
  
  Our first known ancestor, who actually had a last name, was already VAYSMAN. Vaysman is a typical two-part Yiddish name that means "wise man" or "white man". A person"s appearance, profession or trades of the character often were used in making their last names. The known fact that our family was heavily involved in the grain processing business led me to the idea that the last name Vaysman was given to accentuate the white color of the flour covering hair and faces of our early ancestors.
  
  I am not sure how "Vaysman" was spelled in the beginning. The earliest Bendery records I found had it as "Visman" rather than "Vaysman" (or "Vaisman"), only later it appeared as "Vaysman" (Вайсман in Russian transcription), but this does not make any difference in the meaning.
  
  Vaysman name has many variations of spellings, depending on the country our relatives lived in or immigrated to, the language they spoke, and even a simple clerical error. In this book, as a matter of convenience, I will be using the spelling from my emigration documents, VAYSMAN. I will also use other spellings known to me: Vaisman, Veisman, Weissman, Waisman, Wajsman and so on.
  
  Due to marriages, our family has expended with many other last names.
  
  The first known last name added to Vaysman was Trachtman (or Trakhtman, Трахтман in Russian transcription). It is also a typical two-part Yiddish name that could mean "thoughtful man" or someone in the clothing business as a tailor or clothing seller.
  
  Now my Vaysman tree includes more than 60 different last names. The most common name change cause is a marriage of a woman. Looking at our family gender diagram, there are approximately equal numbers of males and females overall. Hence you may expect that the original last name Vaysman will, if not dominate; at least appear often in the future generations. In reality, that is not how it happened. In the beginning of the 20th century, boys were dying of a childhood diseases more often than girls were. Yet this is not the only reason Vaysman is not the prevalent name anymore. The main shift happened in the last half of the 20th centure when Vaysmans" men were more prone to have daughters. Amongst the 30 living individuals who were born with the last name of Vaysman, 20 are female who have changed or will change their last names in the future. Between those remaining 10 men, almost all fathered daughters only. Today, and I would be very happy to find myself wrong, we only have several men of the last name Vaysman. They are Gabriel Vaysman and Andres Vaysman, sons of Gabriel David Vaysman from Argentina, descendants of Haskel; Elisha Rowan Weisman, son of Raphael Weisman from South Africa, descendants of Wolf Vaysman; Danny Weisman, son of Lionel Weisman, also Wolf"s branch from South Africa; Ethan Mirko White, son of Aaron White of the Haskel"s brunch from the USA.
  
  
  Talking about the marriages, I would like to mention the cases where close relatives married. It actually happened in our family, and it is permitted under the Jewish law. One marriage occurred in Gersh"s branch between the first cousins Ester Koyfman and Gersh Vaysman. The other case brought together members of two generations and, at the same time, two family branches (Gersh"s and Henna-Rosya"s): Haim Trachtman married Raya (Khaya) Koyfman who was his first cousin once removed (daughter of the first cousin). By the way, Raya was older than Haim, even though technically she was a member of the next generation. It happened due to the age difference (19 years) between Gersh and his younger sister Henna-Rosya.
  
  On two occasions, sisters married the same husband in different years. Sisters Kenya and Rivka Vaysman from Gersh"s branch were married to Gersh Koyfman and the other two sisters Gitl and Anna from the same family - to Abram Kamisher. This was happening in the tragic cases when a husband would marry a sister of his deceased wife, another Jewish tradition.
  
  By the way, Michael Vaysman from Azriel"s branch is married to Emma Vaysman who has the same last name but not related in any way.
  
  Even though marriages were the primary cause of new names in the family, in some cases last names were changed when someone moved to a new country and wanted the name to sound more familiar to the native people. Thus, one of potential Vaysman name carriers from Hoskel"s branch, Harry Vaysman, who immigrated to USA from Moldova and also had male descendants, changed his name to White. Two of his married sisters became Star and Glass for the same reason. The last name Star arose from the name Starakov (or, more likely, Starikov, meaning an old one in Russian), and the origin of Glass is unknown to me.
  
  Working on the family tree, I figured that given names were not always corresponding the metric document name, or the name the person was remembered by.
  
  Jewish given names were often changed due to influences of the diaspora"s spoken language. One of the common male names running in our family in the 19th and the first half of the 20th centuries was Gersh. Gersh is a variant of Yiddish name Hirsh or Hershel, meaning "deer". Let us look at this particular name transformation as an example. In the documents of the 18th and the 19th century, we can see this name in different variants: Gersh, Gershko or Gershon, more or less resembling the Yiddish origin of the name. After the October Revolution, most Jewish names were substituted with the Russian names sounded somewhat similar, and Gersh became Grigoriy with the nickname of Grisha. The same way Velvel or Wolf became Vladimir (nickname Volodya) and Shprintza transformed to Alexandra (nickname Shura). Many of our relatives who were born in the USSR have Russian, not Jewish, names: Alexander, Alla, Anna, Dmitriy, Eugenia, Galina, Georgiy, Konstantin, Marina, Raisa, Tatyana and so on.
  
  At times in the past names were changed per Jewish traditions. For example, Gersh"s daughter Gitl had to change her name in order to get married because her husband"s mother with the same name was still alive, and no two living persons who lived together could carry the same names. Therefore, everybody called Gitl Tzilya instead.
  
  It was a traditional rule not to name children after living relatives, and the children often received the names of their dead grandparents or other dead relatives. These particular Jewish traditions helped me in my research. I could predict the names of people in different generations or confirm the family relationships by comparing their first names.
  
  The most common female names in our tree are Anna and Rachel and the most intriguing name of all was and still is - Anerosya (Анерося in Russian). This is how my father called the sister of his grandfather Mendel. Different relatives provided me with different spelling of this name, such as Anna-Rosa, Henya-Roza or Genya-Rosya. I spend a lot of time trying to find any records looking for Anerosya. Then I stumbled upon a marriage certificate where she was mentioned as Rosya (like her grandmother), neither an Anerosya nor anything alike. I still do not know why my father remembered her by this unusual name that I could not find in the name dictionaries. Most likely, she had a double name pronounced as one word. In regards to her marriage certificate, a simple loss of a part of her "dual" name could occur. I can add that double names were typical for Jews of those days. It was usually a combination of the Hebrew and Yiddish names with the similar meanings.
  
  The more generations we have, the more variants of names we can see. Even in Israel, there is a tendency to give modern names instead of the traditional ones. The places of birth and mixed marriages also influenced the name choices. These are some given name variations from our family tree:
  
  Rachel, Rukhl, Rukhlya, Raquel, Khaya
  Eliyahu, Elia, Elli, Ely, Ilyusha, Elik
  Genya, Anna, Anya, Ana, Chana
  Yefim, Fima, Philip, Haim
  Leyzer, Lazar, Leyzor
  Ita, Ida
  Borukh, Berl, Boris, Borya
  Gershko, Gersh, Hirsh, Gershon, Grigoriy, Grisha
  Velvel, Wolf, Wolf, Vladimir, Volodya, Vova
  Azriel, Israel
  Smiel, Shmiel, Shmulik, Shmil, Smoal
  Mordko, Mortko, Mordkay, Mordekhay, Misha, Marcos
  Shendle, Shendle, Shaindlya
  ...and more
  
  
  Chapter 2. The Family Tree
  
  Our Early Ancestors
  
  In my research, I was not only able to find names and birthdays of Eliyahu and Rukhl Vaysman (my great-great-grandparents). I also learn that the name of Eliyahu"s father was Gershko (Gersh) who was a son of Abram. I found it while working with the so-called Revision Lists (Census) records of 1848 and 1954 that listed Eliyahu and his family. This document gave me the names and dates of all the earliest ancestors from the last quarter of the 18 century. The history began to unfold right in front of my eyes.
  
  So let us start over. Our earliest known ancestor was Abram Vaysman.
  
  Abram Vaysman was born around 1780 considering the age of his first known son. Even though I assigned a last name for him, he hardly had one because ordinary people did not have the last names then. Most likely, Abram was born and lived in Bendery where later, according to the document mentioned above, his son Eliyahu lived. Knowing that the Jews came to Bendery in around 1769, Abram could be among the first Jews that populated this area.
  
  I believe that Abram died somewhere after 1847, meaning he lived more than 60 years, a long life by the contemporary standards. I do not know his wife"s name and can only speculate that one of her two granddaughters Ester or Basya could have been named after her. Abram probably had many children, a common reality of those times, but only the record of Gershko was available to me.
  
  Gershko (Gersh) Vaysman represents the second generation in my tree. He was born in 1801 in Bendery and belonged to a middle class (petty bourgeois) group of the city population. Most likely Gershko was married twice. In 1819 (at age 18), he got married and had a son Mendel. Probably his wife died and in about 1833 (at age 32) he married Rosya (age 25, last name unknown). I do not know when and how Gershko and his wives died. Gersh Vaysman had seven children:
  MENDEL
  LAZOR
  MORTKO
  ESTER
  ELIYAHU
  SHAYA
  BASYA
  
  I got this data from 1948 and 1950 Revision Lists (Census) of Bessarabia. This is the information from 1950 Census.
  
  
  Town
  Surname
  Given Name
  Father
  Relationship
  Sex
  Year Left
  
  Reason
  Comments
  Age
  Bendery
  Vaysman
  Gershko
  Abram
  Head of
  Household
  M
  
  52
  
  
  
  
  Middle Class
  
  
  Vaysman
  Mendel
  Gershko
  Son
  M
  
  33
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  Vaysman
  Leyzer
  Gershko
  Son
  M
  
  20
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  Vaysman
  Mortko
  Gershko
  Son
  M
  
  
  
  1852
  
  Died
  
  
  
  
  Vaysman
  Elya
  Gershko
  Son
  M
  
  11
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  Vaysman
  Shaya
  Gershko
  Son
  M
  
  
  
  1851
  
  Died
  
  
  
  
  Vaysman
  Rosya
  
  
  Wife
  F
  
  45
  
  
  
  
  Gershko's wife
  
  
  Vaysman
  Ester
  Gershko
  Daughter
  F
  
  13
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  Vaysman
  Basya
  Gershko
  Daughter
  F
  
  
  
  1851
  
  Died
  
  
  
  
  Vaysman
  Ester
  
  
  Daughter-in-law
  F
  
  25
  
  
  
  
  Mendel's wife
  
  
  Vaysman
  Feyga
  
  
  Daughter-in-law
  F
  
  19
  
  
  
  
  Leyzer's wife
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  This is how the original document in Russian looked:
  
  
  MENDEL VAYSMAN was born in 1820 in Bendery. In 1848 (at age 28), he married Ester (age 20). I have no information about their children and fate.
  
  LAZOR VAYSMAN was born in 1834 in Bendery. In 1835 (at age 20), he married Feyga (age 19). I have no information about their children and fate.
  
  MORTKO VAYSMAN was born in 1838 in Bendery and died in 1852 (at age 14) most likely from a childhood disease.
  
  ESTER VAYSMAN was born in 1840 in Bendery. I do not have information about her adult live.
  
  ELIYAHU (ELIA) VAYSMAN was born in 1801 in Bendery. He is our direct ancestor. In 1861 (at age 19) he married Rukhl Dina (age 19), daughter of Leyb (I do not know her last name). Eliyahu was in the wheat selling business and died in about 1925 (at age 83). His wife Rukhl died in 1916 (at age 74). Eliyahu Vaysman and Rukhl had seven children:
  Gersh Zvi
  Mendel
  Hoskel
  Khaya Liba
  Rosya
  Azriel
  Velvel
  
  SHAYA VAYSMAN was born in 1844 and died in 1851 (at age 7) most likely from a childhood disease.
  
  BASYA VAYSMAN was born in 1846. She died in 1851 (at age 5) most likely from a childhood disease.
  
  
  Descendants of Gersh Vaysman
  
  I already mentioned that Gersh is the most common male name in our family, especially in earlier generations. According to Jewish tradition, children should be name after dead relatives. Often grandsons were name after their grandfathers. We shall see later how Gersh"s descendants respected this tradition.
  
  GERSH VAYSMAN was born on June 3, 1864 in Bendery to Eliyahu and Rukhl (Rachel) Vaysman. I was able to find his birth certificate with the exact birth date. I also learned the full name of his mother (Rukhle-Dina) and confirmed that our early ancestors resided in Bendery.
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Birth Records, 1829-1910 about Gersh / Zvi Vaysman
  
  Name:
  Gersh / Zvi Vaysman
  Gender:
  Male
  Birth Date:
  3 Jul 1864
  Birth Town:
  Kishinev
  Birth Guberniya (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Father's Name:
  Elya / Elyahu
  Mother's Name:
  Rukhlya Dina / Rachel-Dina
  Registration Place:
  Kishinev
  Registration Year:
  1864
  Comments:
  mohel Moishe BRIMER / Yankel ZUSMAN, father from Bendery
  Other Towns Mentioned:
  Bendery
  
  
  
  Often you will find Kishinev as the birth town for many of those who actually were born in Bendery. Bendery was a small town, and to register a birth (or a marriage, or a death) people had to travel to Kishinev. A city of registration was often recorded as a birthplace. Most likely Gersh was named after his paternal grandfather. In about 1892 (at age 28) Gersh married Khaya Takmazheiskiy (age 19), daughter of Wolf Zeev Takmazheiskiy. Gersh was involved in the family grain business. He died tragically, was murdered during a pogrom in Kishinev in 1925 (at age 61). Khaya died in Kishinev in the beginning of 1950s (around age of 80). Gersh Vaysman and Khaya Takmazheiskaya had six children:
  KENYA
  UNNAMED BOY
  RIVKA
  MOTL
  TZILYA
  ANNA
  
  KENYA VAYSMAN was born on March 30, 1893 in Bendery to Gersh Vaysman and Khaya Takmazheiskaya. On January 17, 1914 (at age 20) Kenya married Gersh Koyfman (age 25).
  
  Kenya"s birth certificate gave me the name of her maternal grandfather, Wolf, and her exact birth date.
  
  In the marriage certificate, Kenya"s name was misspelled as Renya. This certificate also has the name of Gersh"s father, Khuna.
  
  
  
  
  
  Kenya"s Birth Certificate:
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Birth Records, 1829-1910 about Kenya Vaysman
  
  Name:
  Kenya Vaysman
  Gender:
  Female
  Birth Date:
  30 Mar 1893
  Birth Town:
  Kishinev
  Birth Guberniya (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Father's Name:
  Gersh / Hirsh
  Father's Father's Name:
  Elya / Eliyohu
  Mother's Name:
  Khaya
  Mother's Father's Name:
  Wolf / Zeev
  Registration Place:
  Kishinev
  Registration Year:
  1893
  Comments:
  Father from Bendery
  
  
  
  
  Gersh"s Marriage Certificate:
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Marriage and Divorce Records, 1879-1915 about Gersh Koifman
  
  Name:
  Gersh Koifman
  Gender:
  Male
  Marriage Date:
  17 Jan 1914
  Town:
  Kishinev
  Uyezd (District):
  Kishinev
  Guberniya (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Father's Given Name:
  Khuna
  Spouse Name:
  Renya
  
  
  
  Gersh was born on September 8, 1888 to Khune Koyfman from Kharkov, Ukraine. Kenya died young (around age of 24) and then Gersh married Kenya"s younger sister Rivka. Kenya Vaysman and Gersh Koyfman had two children who, unfortunately, did not survive infancy:
  UNKNOWN
  UNKNOWN
  
  UNNAMED boy was born on November 14, 1894 in Bendery to Gersh Vaysman and Khaya Takmazheiskaya. He died in 5 days from convulsions. This is his death certificate:
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Death Records, 1858-1914 about Nameless Vaysman
  
  Name:
  Nameless Vaysman
  Est. Birth Year:
  abt 1894
  Gender:
  Male
  Age at Death:
  5 Days
  Death Date:
  19 Nov 1894
  Town:
  Kishinev
  Guberniya (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Cause of Death:
  Convulsions
  Residence:
  Bender
  Record Year:
  1894
  Record Location:
  Kishinev
  Father's Given Name:
  Gersh
  Other Towns:
  Bender
  Comments:
  Father was petty bourgeois from Bender
  
  
  
  RIVKA VAYSMAN was born on May 15, 1897 in Bendery to Gersh Vaysman and Khaya Takmazheiskaya. In about 1918 (at age 21), she married Gersh Koyfman (age 30). (As mentioned above, Gersh was married earlier to Rivka"s older sister Kenya). Gersh died shortly after the end of the World War II by committing suicide on June 9, 1945 (at age 56) in Kurilovka, Russia. Rivka died in Kishinev on September 30, 1978 (about the age of 81) of stroke. Rivka Vaysman and Gersh Koyfman had five children:
  SHPRINTSA
  RUKHL
  KHUNE(WOLF, VLADIMIR)
  ESTER
  KENYA
  
  Gersh Koyfman, his wife Rivka and daughters Shpritsa and Raya (Rukhl)
  
  
  
  SHPRINTSA (SHURA) KOYFMAN was born on December 25, 1918 in Kishinev to Rivka Vaysman and Gersh Koyfman. She died on June 10, 1939 (at age 19) from tuberculosis. She was not married.
  
  RUKHL (RAYA) KOYFMAN was born on June 14, 1920 in Kishinev to Rivka Vaysman and Gersh Koyfman.
  On September 28, 1940 (at age 20), she married Haim Trachtman (age 23) who was her uncle (from Anerosya"s branch). Haim was born on November 22, 1917 to Yankel Trachtman and Anerosya Vaysman. He died on May 22, 1978 (at age 60) in Kishinev from adrenal cancer. On March 20, 1991 (at age 70) Raya immigrated to Israel. Raya died in Tel Aviv of pneumonia on June 10, 2010 (at age 89). Raya Koyfman and Haim Trachtman had two children:
  Ita
  Alexandra
  
  
  Ita Trachtman was born on March 27, 1941 in Kishinev to Raya Koyfman and Haim Trachtman. Ita died in evacuation during the World War II (at age of several months). Here is her birth certificate in Russian.
  
  
  
  Alexandra (Shura) Trachtman was born on February 19, 1943 to Raya Koyfman and Haim Trachtman. She was born in Saratov region, Russia where her family was evacuated during the World War II. Shura was named after her died-young aunt Shprintsa. Shura was an accountant. She married Vladimir (Wolf) Shor who was born on December 17, 1943 to Moisey Shor and Dina Paskar" in Fergana, Uzbekistan were his family were evacuated during the World War II. He was a turner. In 1991, Shura (at age 48) and Vladimir (at age 48) immigrated to Israel where Shura unfortunately died on December 3, 1994 (at age 51) of breast cancer. In 2012, Vladimir Shor (age 69) still lived in Israel (HodHaSharon). Vladimir Shor and Shura Trachtman have a daughter
  Rosita
  
  Rosita Shor was born on May 25, 1972 in Kishinev. She completed 2 years of Kishinev Medical University and continued her carrier as a nurse after immigrating to Israel on January 1, 1991 (at age 18). She is married to Adir Glyukman, a medical doctor who was born in 1965 in Tallinn, Estonia. In 2012, the family lived in Israel (HodHaSharon). Rosita Shor and Adir Glyukman have three children:
  Asaf (born on April 26, 1997)
  Mihal (born on March 19, 2000)
  Amir (born on February 6, 2010)
  
  
  
  
  KHUNE (WOLF, VLADIMIR) KOYFMAN was born on December 4, 1922 in Kishinev to Rivka Vaysman and Gersh Koyfman. He was married to Lisa Shiglik.
  Wolf was a professional athlete. At some point of his life, he changed his last name to his mother"s maiden name and became Vaysman (Waisman). In 1974 (at age 52), Wolf"s family immigrated to Israel. He died in Haifa in 2006 (at age 84). Wolf Waisman and Lisa Shiglik have three children:
  Svetlana
  Grigoriy
  Lera
  
  Svetlana (Ora) Vaysman (Waisman) was born on October 20, 1950 in Kishinev to Wolf Waisman and Lisa Shiglik. She graduated from Textile University in Moscow and immigrated to Israel. In 2012, Svetlana lived in Tel Aviv. She has two children:
  David (Dima)
  Shira
  
  David (Dima) Zohar was born on May 5 (year unknown) in Binyamina, Haifa, Israel. In 2012, he lived in Giv"At Shmuel, Hamerkaz. He is divorced and has two children:
  Omer (born on March 20, 1998 in Israel)
  Yarden (born on May 16, 2002 in Israel)
  
  Shira Zohar was born on October 27, 1979 in Israel where she lived in 2012.
  
  Grigoriy Vaysman (Waisman) was born on February 20, 1952 in Kishinev to Wolf Waisman and Lisa Shiglik. In 1975 (at age 23), he immigrated to Israel. Grigoriy is married to BatSheva (Shura) Abuliak who was born on May 18, 1953. Shura worked as a service agent and retired in 2008. Grigoriy is an electrician. In 2012, they lived in Haifa. Grigoriy Waisman and Shura Abuliak have two children:
  Haim
  Lea
  
  Haim Vaysman (Waisman) was born on February 7, 1974 in Kishinev and was brought to Israel (at age of 1) by his parents. Haim is married to Maya Stoler. She is an Assistant professor in Fordham University, and Haim is a professor of Civil Engineering at Columbia University. In 2012, the family lived in USA (New York). Haim Vaysman and Maya Stoler have two children:
  Efrat (birthday unknown)
  Ella (birthday unknown)
  
  Lea Vaysman (Waisman) was born on November 24, 1980 in Israel. On May 26, 2006 (at age 25), she married Perry Shaler (age 26) who was born on March 4, 1980. In 2012, they lived in Karkur where Lea works as an engineer. Lea Waisman and Perry Shaler have two children:
  Shelly Sima (born on July 8, 2008 in Israel)
  Barak (born in Israel, birthday unknown)
  
  Lera Vaysman (Waisman) was born on October 24, 1960 in Kishinev to Wolf Waisman and Lisa Shiglik. Lera is married to Reuven Arkind who was born on February 5, 1953. In 2012, they lived in Kadima, Israel. Lera Waisman and Reuven Arkind have three children:
  Einav (born on July 3, 1985, in Israel, on September 25, 2011 got married to Itzik Nemni)
  Noam (born on September 18, 1986 in Israel)
  Tal (born on May 15, 1995 in Israel)
  
  ESTER (FIRA) KOYFMAN was born on December 25, 1924 in Kishinev to Rivka Vaysman and Gersh Koyfman. She was married to Gersh Vaysman, born on August 23, 1922. (More information on Gersh is in the section 4.1.). In 1973 (when Fira was 49), they immigrated to Israel where Gersh died in 2007 (at age 85). In 2012, Ester (age 88) still lived in Kiriyat-Yam. Ester Koyfman and Gersh Vaysman have a daughter
  Eugenia
  
  Eugenia Vaysman was born on January 19, 1949 in Kishinev and immigrated to Israel in 1974 (at age 24). She was married to Zisya Itzhack who passed away in 2012. In 2012, Eugenia lived in Kiriyat-Yam and worked as a guitar teacher. Eugenia Vaysman and Zisya Itzhack have two children:
  Alexander
  Rebecca
  
  Alexander Itzhack was born on September 19, 1971 in Kishinev. He was brought to Israel in 1974 (at age 3). Alexander is a chef. In 2012, he lived in Kiriyat-Yam. On June 13, 2013 he married Elena Strukova who was born on 22 Jul 1960, from Russia. In 2019 they lived in Voronezh (Russia) and had a son.
  
  Rebecca (Rebbeka) Itzhack was born on February 20, 1980 in Israel. She was named after her grandmother Rivka. Rebecca is a nurse. She is married to Justin Pesta who was born on July 21, 1980 in Minnesota, USA. In 2012, they lived in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. Rebecca Itzhack and Justin Pesta have a son John (born on January 1, 2013 in Minneapolis)
  
  KENYA (SHENDLE) KOYFMAN was born on January 2, 1926 in Kishinev to Rivka Vaysman and Gersh Koyfman. In about 1945 (at age 19), she married Leonid Shpolyanskiy born in about 1916, from Dubosari, Moldova. Later, Leonid among other relatives was repressed by Soviets and served his time in one of Gulag"s labor camps. He died in Israel in about 1995 (at age 79). In 2012, Kenya (age 86) still lived in Herzliya. Kenya Koyfman and Leonid Shpolyanskiy have two children:
  Grigoriy
  Ida
  
  Grigoriy Shpolyanskiy was born on July 23, 1950 in Kishinev from where he immigrated to Israel. Grigoriy was married two times. His first wife was Etya Shpumberg, born 18 Mar 1951. She died on Apr 27, 1978 and Gersh married his second wife Raisa (about 1950). In 2012, he lived in Herzliya. and has three children:
  Silvia (from the first marriage)
  Alina (from the second marriage)
  Robert (from the second marriage)
  
  Silvia Shpolyanskiy (Spoliansci) was born on Feb 27, 1977 in Ribnitza, Moldova. She is married to Lev Meerson (born 9 Sep 1963 in Riga, Latvia). In 2019 they lived in Hanover, Germany. Silvia and Lev have a boy:
   3.5.1.1.1.Kevin (born 3 Dec 2003 in Hanover)
  
  Alina Shpolyanskiy was born on Jan 30, 1983 in Israel. She is married to Niv Bornstein who is an artist. In 2012 the family lived in Israel. Alina Shpolyanskiy and Niv Bornstein have two children:
  Daniel (born in 2008 in Israel)
  Lia (born in 2012 in Israel)
  
  Robert Shpolyanskiy was born on May 4, 1980 in Kishinev. He is married to Ekaterina Tetelbaum (born on November 27, 1980). In 2012, they lived in Herzliya, Israel.
  
  Ida Shpolyanski was born in November 1948 in Kishinev. She is married to Nikolay Barilo from Ukraine. Ida and Nikolay have a family-owned and operated food business. In 2012, they lived in Canada (Toronto). Ida Shpolyanskiy and Nikolay Barilo have two sons:
  Edward
  Alexander
  
  Edward Barilo was born on June 30, 1968 in Kishinev. He is married to Vita Kats (born on June 13, 1974). Edward works in the family food business. In 2012, he and his family lived in Toronto. Edward Barilo and Vita Kats have two children:
  Unknown
  Unknown
  
  Alexander Barilo was born on November 7, 1972 in Kishinev. He is married to Irina Krinitskaya (born on August 24, 1974 in Ukraine). In 2012, they lived in Canada (Toronto) where he worked as an electrical engineer in the family food business. Alexander Barilo and Irina Krinitskaya have three daughters:
  Unknown
  Unknown
  Unknown
  
  MARK (MOTL, MORDKHAY) VAYSMAN was born in 1898 in Bendery to Gersh Vaysman and Khaya Takmazheiskaya. His name in birth certificate was Mordkhay even though everyone remembers him as Mark or Motl.
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Birth Records, 1829-1910 about Mordkhay Vaysman
  
  Name:
  Mordkhay Vaysman
  Gender:
  Male
  Birth Date:
  1898
  Birth Town:
  Kishinev
  Birth Uyezd (District):
  Kishinev
  Birth Guberniya (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Father's Name:
  Gersh
  Father's Father's Name:
  Elya
  Registration Place:
  Kishinev
  Registration Year:
  1898
  
  
  
  In about 1921 (at age 23), he married Shendle (Zhenya) Kanchik (age 21) who was born in September 1900 in Tiraspol, Moldova. She was an aunt of Michael Kanchik who then married Stella Trachtman from the Anerosya"s branch. Mark did not survive the World War II. He died in evacuation (at age about 44). Mark"s son Gersh recorded his death information at Yad Vashem:
  
  There is a discrepancy in Mark"s birthday in these two documents. I assumed the date from the birth certificate to be the correct one. Mark"s wife Zhenya was killed during bombardment in 1942 (at age 42) at Gornaya rail station (Rostov-on-Don, Russia). Mark Vaysman and Shendle Kanchik had five children:
  GERSH
  WOLF
  SHNEIR
  ELIK
  SHMIEL
  
  GERSH VAYSMAN was born on August 23, 1922 in Kishinev. He graduated from industrial lyceum (under Romanians). During the World War II, he served in Soviet Army as a chief assistant of the repair service. After the war, he married his cousin Ester Koyfman (look for Ester Koyfman above in the section 3.4.). In 1973 (at age 51) Gersh with family immigrated to Israel. He died in Kiryat-Yam in 2007 (at age 85).
  
  WOLF (VELVEL) VAYSMAN was born in 1924 in Kishinev. During the World War II, he served in Soviet Army. Wolf was killed in battle at age 18.
  
  SHNEIR (ALEXANDER) VAYSMAN was born on February 6, 1933 in Kishinev to Mark Vaysman and Shendle Kanchik. He graduated from Kishinev Agricultural Institute and Moscow Institute of Railway Transport. Shneir is married to Raisa Shenker (born on July 5, 1935 in Ribnitza, Moldova). She is a medical doctor (pulmonologist). In 1999 (at age 66), family immigrated to Israel. In 2012, Shneir (age 79) and his wife Raisa (age 77) still lived in Ashdod. Shneir Vaysman and Raisa Shenker have two children:
  Marina
  Galina
  
  Marina Vaysman was born on May 18, 1961 in Kishinev. Marina is a medical doctor (nephrologists). She is married to Valeriy Roif. In 1991, (age 30) family immigrated to Israel. In 2012, they lived in Ashdod. Marina Vaysman and Valeriy Roif have two children:
  Stanislav (born on September 1, 1982 in Kishinev)
  Eugeniy (born on June 6, 1988 in Kishinev)
  
  Galina Vaysman was born on September 3, 1966 in Kishinev. She graduated from Kishinev Medical University and became a dentist. She was married (and then divorced) to Yakov Lerner. In 1991 (age 24) Galina immigrated to Israel where in 2000 (at age 34) she married Igor Perelman. Igor works as a safety specialists on construction sites. In 2012, they lived in Ashdod. Galina Vaysman has two children:
  Mariana (from the first marriage. She was born on August 19, 1990 in Kishinev and brought to Israel at the age of 10 months).
  Arthur (from the second marriage. He was born on November 30, 2000 in Israel).
  
  ELIK VAYSMAN was born in 1936 in Kishinev to Mark Vaysman and Shendle Kanchik. His fate during the World War II still remains unclear. In about 1942 (at age 6), he was admitted to the orphanage #3 in Namangan, Uzbekistan. All attempts to find him after that remain uncexsesful.
  SHMIEL VAYSMAN was born in 1939 in Kishinev to Mark Vaysman and Shendle Kanchik. He died in evacuation in 1941 (at age 2).
  
  
  GITL (TZILYA) VAYSMAN was born in about 1902 to Gersh Vaysman and Khaya Takmazheiskaya. I do not know if she was born in Bendery, or in Kishinev. In about 1925 (at age 23) Gitl married Abram Kamisher (born in 1901, in Orgeev, Moldova). Because Gitl"s mother-in-law had the same first name, everybody started to call her Tzilya. Tzilya died in 1942 (at age 40) in Uzbekistan, Andizhan (while in the wartime evacuation), from a complication during a minor surgery (removal of the cyst). After the war, Abram married Gitl"s younger sister Anna, whose husband did not come back from the front. Gitl Vaysman and Abram Kamisher had three children:
  ELIK
  VELVEL
  SHPRINTSA
  
  ELIK (ILYSHA) KAMISHER was born on December 5, 1926 in Kishinev to Gitl Vaysman and Abram Kamisher. During the World War II, he and his father served in the Soviet Army. In 1957 Elik (at age 31) married Margarita Getzel (age 25) born on August 14, 1932 in Kishinev. In 1990 Elik (age 64) and his family immigrated to Israel. In 2012, Elik (age 86) and Margarita (age 80) still lived in Nazareth. Elik Kamisher and Margarita Getzel have a daughter:
  Galina
  
  Galina Kamisher was born on August 28, 1958 in Kishinev. She is married to Joseph Gendelman. In 1990 (at age 32) Galina and her family immigrated to Israel and then to Canada. In 2012, they lived in Toronto. Galina Kamisher and Joseph Gendelman have two children:
  Edward
  Agness
  
  Edward Gendelman was born on July 17, 1979 in Kishinev. On September 3, 2006 (at age 27), he married Sofia. In 2012, they lived in Canada (Toronto). They have two children:
  Aaron
  Eliana
  
  Agness Gendelman was born in 1984 in Kishinev. She is married to Meir Fallen and they have a son Ethan (born 20 August 2015). In 2012, they lived in Toronto.
  
  VELVEL KAMISHER was born in 1936 in Kishinev to Gitl Vaysman and Abram Kamisher. He disappeared during the World War II in Kyzylorda (Kazakhstan). His fate remains unknown to this day.
  
  SHPRINTSA KAMISHER was born in 1940 in Kishinev to Gitl Vaysman and Abram Kamisher. She disappeared during the World War II (at age 3) in Kyzylorda, (Kazakhstan). Her fate remains unknown to this day.
  
  I was trying to find any information about Velvel and his little sister Shprintsa. One of the complications could be misspelling of their last name in the evacuation papers due to misreading of handwriting or carelessness. Here is their mother Gitl"s evacuation paper (in Russian). The last name was spelled Kommer instead of Kamisher. In another paper, the last name was spelled as Kashimer. Those are the examples of the clerical errors that can lead to much confusion trying to identify people from the past.
  
  
  ANNA VAYSMAN was born in about 1911 to Gersh Vaysman and Khaya Takmazheiskaya. I do not know if she was born in Bendery, or in Kishinev. In about 1940 (at age 29), she married Moishe Aginskiy (same age, born in 1911 in Kishinev) who was a shoemaker and went missing during the World War II. After the war, Anna (at age 34) married Abram Kamisher (her past away sister Gitl (Tzilya)"s husband). Anna was a pharmacist. She died in 1958 (at age 47) of cancer in Kishinev. Anna Vaysman and Abram Kamisher did not have any children. Later in his life, Abram immigrated to Israel where he died in Naharia in 1983 (at age 82).
  
  Descendants of Mendel Vaysman
  
  Mendel is my direct ancestor, my great-grandfather.
  
  MENDEL VAYSMAN was born on February 12, 1868 in Bendery to Eliyahu and Rukhl Vaysman.
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Birth Records, 1829-1910 about Mendel Vaysman
  
  Name:
  Mendel Vaysman
  Gender:
  Male
  Birth Date:
  12 Feb 1868
  Birth Town:
  Kishinev
  Birth Guberniya (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Father's Name:
  Elya
  Mother's Name:
  Rukhlya / Rakhel
  Registration Place:
  Kishinev
  Registration Year:
  1868
  Comments:
  Mohel Shmul AVERBUKH, father from Bendery
  Other Towns Mentioned:
  Bendery
  
  
  
  Likely, he was named after his uncle. In 1892 (at age 24), he married Yoykheved (Hayved) Neyman (age 23) who was born on December 22, 1869 in Kishinev. She was a daughter of Haim and Rukhl Neyman from Kishinev.
  
  
  
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Marriage and Divorce Records, 1879-1915 about Mendel Vaysman
  
  Name:
  Mendel Vaysman
  Gender:
  Male
  Marriage Date:
  1892
  Town:
  Kishinev
  Guberniya (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Father's Given Name:
  El
  Spouse Name:
  Yekheved Neiman
  Spouse Gender:
  Female
  
  
  
  Mendel was a merchant and worked in the family grain business. He went missing during the World War II at around age of 73. His wife died in 1941 (age 72) in Volgograd region where she was evacuated from Kishinev during the war. Mendel Vaysman and Yoykheved Neyman had eight children:
  AVRAAM
  SHAYA
  BENYAMIN
  GERSH
  LEYB
  ITA
  DAVID
  KOPEL
  
  The first four children, did not survive infancy and my grandfather Leyb Vaysman was the first surviving child.
  
  
  AVRAAM VAYSMAN was born in 1894 in Bendery and died on April 3, 1894 (age 5 weeks) of a childhood disease. Perhaps he was named after his great-grandfather.
  
  Here is a death certificate of Avraam. I also found the certificates for the rest of young died brothers.
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Death Records, 1858-1914 about Avraam / Avraham Vaysman / Weisman
  
  Name:
  Avraam / Avraham Vaysman / Weisman
  Est. Birth Year:
  abt 1894
  Gender:
  Male
  Age at Death:
  5 Weeks
  Death Date:
  3 Apr 1894
  Town:
  Kishinev
  Guberniya (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Cause of Death:
  children's illness
  Residence:
  Bender
  Record Year:
  1894
  Record Location:
  Kishinev
  Father's Given Name:
  Mendel
  Other Towns:
  Bender
  Comments:
  Father was petty bourgeois from Bender
  
  
  
  SHAYA VAYSMAN was born in 1895 in Bendery and died on February 23, 1900 (at age 5) from tubercular inflammation of the brain. Shaya was named after his uncle who himself died at age of 7.
  
  BENYAMIN VAYSMAN was born in 1898 in Bendery. He died in Kishinev on June 14, 1899 (at 11 months) of diarrhea.
  
  GERSH VAYSMAN was born on December 18, 1899 in Kishinev and died on June 6, 1901 (at age 1) from scarlet fever.
  
  (I was confused in the beginning, why Mendel named his son Gersh while his brother Gersh was still alive. Then I realized that baby Gersh was born in Kishinev where Mendel"s family relocated from Bendery, but Gersh"s family still was living in Bendery. Because they lived in different places, Mendel could name his son after the grandfather Gersh even though his brother Gersh was still alive.)
  
  LEYB (LEV) VAYSMAN was born in 1901 in Kishinev to Mendel Vaysman and Yoykheved Neyman. His correct birthday was forgotten and he celebrated his birthday on December 5 (the same story could be told about his son Yuliy and brother David, they all were not sure about their birthdays and decided to celebrate them on the same day, December 5).
  
  Unfortunately, Lev"s birth certificate I found does not have his complete birth data as well.
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Birth Records, 1829-1910 about Leyb Vaysman
  
  Name:
  Leyb Vaysman
  Gender:
  Male
  Birth Date:
  1901
  Birth Town:
  Kishinev
  Birth Guberniya (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Father's Name:
  Mendel
  Father's Father's Name:
  El
  Registration Place:
  Kishinev
  Registration Year:
  1901
  
  
  
  
  Lev was a student in Vienna Polytechnic Institute (did not complete). In about 1927 (at age 26), he married Anna (Genya) Meites (age 27) who was born on March 21, 1900 in Kishinev to Yoil and Cyettil. (Anna"s brother was a Hebrew poet Eliyahu Meitus who lived and died in Israel.) Before Soviets came to power, Lev was a merchant, selling grain together with his father and uncles, and was associated with Schwartzberg and Cohen"s windmills. Under the Soviets he was also involved in Moldavian grain business (was a head of Commodities Division at Moldraszhirmaslo). In 1941 (age 40) he became a victim of the Soviet political repressions and served time in one of the Gulag"s labor camps untill 1944. Lev died in Kishinev on November 3, 1976 (at age 75) from heart attack. In 1980, his wife Anna (at age 80) immigrated to USA along with her youngest son"s family. She died in New York on June 11, 1996 (at age 96) of pneumonia. Lev Vaysman and Anna Meites had two children:
  YULIY
  YEFIM
  
  YULIY VAYSMAN (my father) was born in Kishinev. Hi is unsure about his date of birth because his birth certificate was lost during the World War II. We assume it is December 5, 1928. After graduating from Kishinev Medical University, Yuliy spent thirteen years working as a doctor in Unceshti, Moldova, and then thirty years as a head of neurology department in Sholokhovskiy, Russia. In 1952 (at age 23), he married his first wife Toliana Tintulova (age 24) born on January 2, 1927 in Kishinev. In 1965, Yuliy (age 37) and Toliana (age 38) divorced. Toliana died on January 3, 2005 (at age 78) in Kishinev. In 1965, Yuliy moved from Moldova to Sholokhovskiy, Rostov-on-Don region, Russia where he married Valentina Reznikova (age 23) the next year. Valentina was born on October 2, 1943 in Novomar"evka, Russia and worked as a nurse. They met in Moldova after Valentina finished Belts nursing school and worked in Yuliy"s medical facility. In 1993, Yuliy (at age 65) and Valentina (at age 48) immigrated to the USA. In 2012, Yuliy (age 84) and Valentina (age 69) still lived in Queens, New York. Yuliy Vaysman has three children:
  Anatoliy (from the first marriage)
  Ella, that is yours truly (from the second marriage)
  Zhanna (from the second marriage)
  
  Anatoliy Tintulov was born on November 24, 1953 in Kishinev. He was never married and is one of a few relatives who still reside in Kishinev. In 2012, Anatoliy was 58.
  
  Ella Vaysman was born on December 29, 1966 in Sholokhovskiy, Russia. She graduated from high school with gold medal of excellence and then in 1991 from Rostov Medical University. She is a medical doctor, neurologist. She was briefly married to Anatoliy Kleyner (no children) and in 1991 (at age 24) she married Vladimir Titov (age 29), born on February 4, 1962 in Novoshakhtinsk, Russia, with whom she divorced in 1993 (at age 26). In the same year, she immigrated to the USA. In 2000, Ella (age 34) remarried Vladimir Titov (age 38) who came to USA for a visit. They divorced again in 2007. On December 31, 2007 Ella (at age 40) married Michael Romm (age 39) born on February 27, 1968 in Moscow, Russia. Michael is a software engineer. Ella and Michael are successful Russian poets. Among many books they published, one was an English translation. Michael has a son Eden (born on December 30, 1993 in San Diego, USA.) from previous marriage. The family lives in San Diego, USA. Ella Vaysman and Vladimir Titov have two children:
  
  Viktoriya (was born on July 29, 1992 in Sholokhovskiy, Russia. She was brought to USA at the age of one year old. In 2012, she was a student at University of California in Santa Barbara (UCSB) with the major in pharmacology.
   Nicole Anna-Maria (born on November 11, 2001 in New York, USA).
  
  Zhanna Vaysman was born on January 4, 1973 in Sholokhovskiy, Russia. In 1993 (at age 20), she immigrated to USA along with her parents, sister and niece and settled in New York. She graduated from the Queens College and works in a hospital as a clinical dietitian. In 1999 (at age 26), she married Martin Cohen (age 31) born on January 8, 1968 in New York. Martin is an attorney in law. In 2012, the family lived in Wilton. Zhanna Vaysman and Martin Cohen have three children:
  David Ari (born on October 2, 2001 in New York)
  Daniel Jordan (born on September 2, 2003 in New York)
  Benjamin Albert (born on December 25, 2005 in Saratoga Spring, USA)
  
  YEFIM (KHAIM, PHILIP) VAYSMAN was born on May 11, 1934 in Kishinev to Lev Vaysman and Anna Meites. In 1959 (at age 25), he married Sofia Bukhaltsev (age 22) born on October 3, 1936 in Kishinev. Yefim was an engineer and Sofia a chemist. In 1980, they immigrated to USA and settled in NY. In 1992 (at age 57) Yefim died from heart attack. By tragic coincident it happened while his brother Yuliy visited him in New York for the first time since Yefim left Kishinev. In 2012, Sofia (age 76) still lived in New York. Yefim Vaysman and Sofia Bukhaltsev have a daughter:
  Yuliya
  
  Yulia (Julia) Vaysman was born on May 18, 1960 in Kishinev. In 1980 (at age 20), she immigrated to USA with her parents. She is married to Alexander Gofyzen who was born on July 29, 1958 in Moscow. Yulia and Alexander are software engineers. In 2012, they lived in New York. Yulia Vaysman and Alexander Gofyzen have a son:
  Benjamin (born on January 4, 1990 in New York, USA and still lived there in 2012.)
  
  ITA VAYSMAN was born on September 13, 1904 in Kishinev to Mendel Vaysman and Yoykheved Neyman.
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Birth Records, 1829-1910 about Ita Vaysman
  
  Name:
  Ita Vaysman
  Gender:
  Female
  Birth Date:
  13 Sep 1904
  Birth Town:
  Kishinev
  Birth Guberniya (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Father's Name:
  Mendel
  Registration Place:
  Kishinev
  Registration Year:
  1904
  
  
  
  In 1923 (at age 19), she married Layzer Spiegel (from Bulboki, Moldova). Ita died in Kishinev in 1938 (at age 34) from tuberculosis. Layzer died in 1977. Ita Vaysman and Layzer Shpigel had two children:
  GALINA
  RAISA
  
  GALINA SHPIGEL was born on September 5, 1924 in Kishinev. In 1953 (at age 29), she married Abraham Nuzbrach (age 29) who was born on August 12, 1925 in Yasi, Romania. Galina worked as an accountant. She died in Kishinev on April 7, 1997 (at age 72) of heart disease. Abraham died on February 23, 1982 (at age 56) in Kishinev. Galina Shpigel and Abraham Nuzbrach had a daughter:
  Ida
  
  Ida Nuzbrach was born on March 3, 1954 in Kishinev. She was named after her grandmother Ita Vaysman. Ida was a history teacher. She married Boris Gabev who was born on August 23, 1954 and also was a teacher. In 2000 (at age 46), Ida immigrated to Israel with her daughter. Regrettably, Ida got sick and died of stroke in Nazareth 5 years later (at age 51). In 2012, Boris Gabev still lived in Kishinev. Ida Nuzbrach and Boris Gabev have a daughter:
  Alexandra (born on March 15, 1989 in Kishinev, came to Israel in 2000 (in age 11) with her mother, and still lived there in 2012)
  
  RAISA SHPIGEL was born on September 2, 1926 in Kishinev to Ita Vaysman and Layzer Shpigel. In 1957 (at age 31), she married Samuel Fridman from Balta, Ukrain. Samuel survived Balta Ghetto during the World War II where he lost his father and other relatives. Samuel died while visiting Moscow on August 14, 1993 from a heart attack. In 1990 s, Raisa immigrated to Germany. She died in Stuttgart on December 30, 1997 (at age 71) of blood cancer. Raisa Shpigel and Samuel Fridman have a daughter:
  Alla
  
  Alla Fridman was born on April 24, 1958 in Kishinev. Alla graduated from Moscow Institute of Management and became an engineer-economist for management in the energy sector. Alla was married to and later divorced Oleg Glebov. In 1990 s, she immigrated to Germany following her mother. In 2012, she lived in Stuttgart. Alla Fridman and Oleg Glebov have a son:
  Roman (was born on December 2, 1981 in Kishinev. In 1990 s, he immigrated to Germany. In 2012, he was a university student at Munich and lived in Augsburg.)
  
  DAVID VAYSMAN was born on November 11, 1907 in Kishinev to Mendel Vaysman and Yoykheved Neyman.
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Birth Records, 1829-1910 about David Vaysman
  
  Name:
  David Vaysman
  Gender:
  Male
  Birth Date:
  11 Nov 1907
  Birth Town:
  Kishinev
  Birth Guberniya (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Father's Name:
  Mendel
  Registration Place:
  Kishinev
  Registration Year:
  1907
  
  
  
  In 1935 (at age 28), he married Ester Brokhman (age 22) who was born in 1913 to Einoch Brokhman and Bluma Naehovich. In 1941, NKVD arrested David for the zionist activities. Here is the information about David I took from Archive of the Jewish Aliya Movement in the USSR"s web site:
  
  "Born in 1907 in Kishinev, he (David) became a member of Maccabi and Beitar in his youth and was active in collecting donations for Keren Kayemet & Keren Tel-Hai. He even stood in the guard of honor during the visits of Chaim Weizman & Nachum Sokolov to the Soviet Union. As a result of his Zionist activities, he was arrested by the Soviet authorities in February 1941 and sentenced to 8 years imprisonment. Released in 1947 in Solikamsk, he returned to Kishinev and eventually managed to get to Israel in 1991."
  
  David did served his time in Siberia (Solikamsk, Komi ASSR), for 6 years, but after being release, he settled in Lvov, Ukraine. In 1991 (at age 84), he immigrated to Israel along with his family. David died on May 8, 1995 (at age 87) in Jerusalem from peritonitis that complicated hernia surgery. Ester died on February 14, 1996 (at age 83). David Vaysman and Ester Brokhman had a daughter:
  BIANA
  
  BIANA (BIMA) VAYSMAN was born on September 10, 1936 in Kishinev. In 1960 (at age 24), she married Alexander Shapiro who was born in 1929, in Saratov, Russia to Klimentiy and Tamara Shapiro. Biana was a librarian and Alexander was a military physician. In 1992, Biana (age 64) and later her husband immigrated to Israel. In 2012, Biana (age 76) and Alexander (age 83) still lived in Jerusalem. Biana Vaysman and Alexander Shapiro have two children:
  Konstantin
  Dmitriy
  
  Konstantin Shapiro was born on September 23, 1961 in Lvov, Ukraine. He graduated from Sport Institute in Lvov and was a Master of Sports in Fencing. In 1991 (at age 30), Konstantin immigrated to Israel. He works as a guard in Knesset. He was married to Khagit (last name unknown) with whom he is now divorced. In 2012, Konstantin lived in Jerusalem. Konstantin Shapiro and Khagit have two children:
  Rafael (born on August 23, 1995 in Israel)
  Daniel (born in 2006 in Israel).
  
  Dmitriy Shapiro was born on May 14, 1970 in Lvov, Ukraine. He graduated from Sport Institute in Lvov. In 1992 (at age 22), he immigrated to Israel. He was married two times. In 2012, he lived in Jerusalem and worked as a tennis instructor. He does not have any children.
  
  KOPEL VAYSMAN was born on April 4, 1910 in Kishinev to Mendel Vaysman and Yoykheved Neyman. Here is Kopel"s birth certificate that proved the information about his birth and marriage as well:
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Birth Records, 1829-1910 about Kopel Vaysman
  
  Name:
  Kopel Vaysman
  Gender:
  Male
  Birth Date:
  4 Apr 1910
  Birth Town:
  Kishinev
  Birth Guberniya (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Father's Name:
  Mendel
  Father's Father's Name:
  Eliyahu
  Mother's Name:
  Yokheved
  Registration Place:
  Kishinev
  Registration Year:
  1910
  Comments:
  Mohel Moshe GOLDENBERG. Father from Bender. Married to Ruhlea Mereins in Chishinau on July 28, 1934 cert. # 487. July 20, 1934
  
  
  On July 28, 1934 (at age 24), he married Rukhl Merims (or possibly Mereins) (age 23) who was born on February 4, 1910 in Kishinev to Nakhman Yaakov Merims and Khana Perelman. Kopel and Rukhl divorced after the World War II because Rukhl decided to be with a man who helped her survive the war while Kopel was away on duty. In about 1945 (at age 35) Kopel married Merriam (Maria) Goresht (age 36) who was born on August 12, 1909 in Kishinev to Moishe Duvid Goresht and Chaya Talmazskiy. Maria was an economist and worked with Kopel in the same organization ("Zagotzerno"). Maria died in Kishinev on November 2, 1969 (at age 60). Later in his life, Kopel was married to Lea Sheinfeld. They both worked at a grocery store. Kopel died in Kishinev in August 1987 (at age 77) from stroke. Rukhl died in about 1983 (age 73) in Orgeev, Moldova. Lea died in Kishinev. She had three sons from previous marriage. Kopel Vaysman had two children:
  TATYANA (from the first marriage)
  EVA (from the second marriage)
  
  TATYANA VAYSMAN was born in about 1935 in Kishinev. During the World War II she was brutally killed in Kishinev Ghetto (at around age of 8). Her mother Rukhl survived with the help of a doctor whom she later married. Eventually they were deported to Siberia where a son was born but did not survive.
  
  EVA VAYSMAN was born on January 9, 1946 in Kishinev and named after grandmother Yoykheved. Eva graduated from Leningrad Medical University and in 1969 (at age 23) married Anatoliy Chistov (from Saint Petersburg, Russia) who unfortunately died on August 24, 2009. Eva is a medical doctor (nephrologists). In 2012 she lived in Saint Petersburg (former Leningrad), Russia. Eva Vaysman and Anatoliy Chistov had two children:
  Vyacheslav
  Maria
  
  Vyacheslav Chistov was born on April 25, 1970 in Saint Petersburg, Russia. Hi is a pilot on international flights. He is married to Natalia Medvedkova. In 2012, they lived in the suburb of Moscow. Vyacheslav Chistov and Natalia Medvedkova have two children:
  Georgiy (born on September 14, 2000 in Saint Petersburg, Russia)
  Matvey (born on April 27, 2010 in Saint Petersburg, Russia)
  
  Maria Chistova was born on May 9, 1974 in Saint Petersburg, Russia. She graduated from Medical University in Sankt-Petersburg. She is a forensic scientist at the Military Medical Academy. Maria is married to Vladimir Rodin who is an Emergency Room physician. In 2012, they lived in Sankt-Petersburg, Russia, and did not have any children.
  
  
  
  
  
  
  About 1956, Kishinev, Moldova
  
  Descendants of Hoskel Vaysman
  
  To describe Hoskel"s branch I turned to memoirs of Annette Lustgarten (with her permission). I met Annette through myheritage.com site where she posted her family tree. She is a granddaughter of Hoskel.
  
  HOSKEL (KHASKEL, YECHAZKEL) VAYSMAN was born in 1870, in Bendery to Eliyahu and Rukhl Vaysman. In 1896 (at age 26) Hoskel married Shendle-Zelda Petrovskiy (age 18). Shendle was born in 1878 in Skvira, Ukraine to Tsudik Petrovskiy and Menukha Furrer.
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Marriage and Divorce Records, 1879-1915 about Khaskel Vaysman
  
  Name:
  Khaskel Vaysman
  Gender:
  Male
  Marriage Date:
  1896
  Town:
  Kishinev
  Uyezd (District):
  Kishinev
  Father's Given Name:
  El
  Spouse Name:
  Sheindlya-Zel'da Petrovskaya
  Spouse Gender:
  Female
  Spouse Father name
  Tsudik
  
  
  Comments:
  Ketubah 48 silver rubles. Groom was Bender townsman and a reserve corporal, by identity card from Bendery town court 12-Sep-1894 #1493. Bride was Skvira townswoman.
  
  
  Most likely, Hoskel"s family moved from Bendery to Kishinev around that period. Hoskel was involved in family grain business, he was buying wheat from peasants and sold it to the mill (or, may be, even owned the mill). He also worked at the Bank Moldavia in Kishinev as an appraiser. Shendle died in about 1920 (at age 42) from self-induced termination of pregnancy. After Shendle"s death Hoskel married Khana (last name unknown, first name can be incorrect). Khana did not have any children. Before the World War II Hoskel went to USA visiting his older children who emigrated there. He stayed for a bit but soon came back to Kishinev to his wife and younger children. Hoskel (at around age of 71) and Khana died during the World War II. They did not flee from Kishinev and were killed by Nazis among many Jews of the Kishinev Ghetto.
  
  
  
  Haskel Vaysman before WW2
  
  Hoskel Vaysman and Shendle Petrovskiy had nine children:
  REYZYA
  KHANA
  MARUCIE
  HERSHEL
  MANIA
  SHMIEL
  AVRUM
  MORDEKHAY
  RACHEL
  
  REYZYA VAYSMAN was born in 1897 in Kishinev and died on May 18, 1901(at age 4) most likely from childhood decease.
  
  
  
  
  
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Death Records, 1858-1914 about Reyzya Vaysman
  
  Name:
  Reyzya Vaysman
  Gender:
  Female
  Death Date:
  18 May 1901
  Town:
  Kishinev
  Guberniya (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Father's Given Name:
  Khaskel
  
  
  
  CHANA (ANNA) VAYSMAN was born on September 17, 1898 in Kishinev.
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Birth Records, 1829-1910 about Khana Vaysman
  
  Name:
  Khana Vaysman
  Gender:
  Female
  Birth Date:
  1898
  Birth Town:
  Kishinev
  Birth Guberniya (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Father's Name:
  Khaskel
  Father's Father's Name:
  Elya
  Registration Place:
  Kishinev
  Registration Year:
  1898
  
  
  
  In 1916 (at age 18), she immigrated to USA to be married to her fiancé Morris Glass with whom she became engaged in Kishinev. Morris was born in about 1897 in Kishinev and likely changed his last name after immigrating to the USA. The name he used in Kishinev is unknown. Anna lived with Morris (and his mother) until they were married. She was the first one who leaved Kishinev and moved abroad. Anna Vaysman and Morris Glass did not have any children. Anna died on April 24, 1991 (at age 92) in Dade County, Florida.
  
  MARUCIE (MARY, MARIYASYA) VAYSMAN was born on September 19, 1900 in Kishinev.
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Birth Records, 1829-1910 about Mariyasya Vaysman
  
  Name:
  Mariyasya Vaysman
  Gender:
  Female
  Birth Date:
  1900
  Birth Town:
  Kishinev
  Birth Guberniya (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Father's Name:
  Khaskel
  Father's Father's Name:
  El
  Registration Place:
  Kishinev
  Registration Year:
  1900
  
  
  
  In 1922 (at age 21) she married Hyman Starakov (age 23) (or, more likely, Starikov). Hyman was born on April 15, 1898 in Peschanka, Moldova to Zvi Starikov. In 1923, Marucie (age 22) and Hyman (age 25) immigrated to USA and settled in Boston. Then their last name was changed to Star. Marucie died in Broward, Florida on August 3, 2000 (at age 99 and 10 months) of bladder cancer. Hymen died on May 9, 1962 (at age 64) of skin cancer. Marucie Vaysman and Hymen Star had three children:
  HARRY
  JENNIE
  ANNETTE
  
  HARRY STAR was born on March 17, 1924 in Boston, Massachusetts, USA. In 1950 (at age 26), he married Aura Estelle Levine (age 20) who was born on March 15, 1930 in Bronx, New York. They divorced on May 9, 1983 when Harry was 56. His second wife was Natalie Kaplan (born in about 1947). Harry died on March 31, 1995 (at age 71). In 2012, Aura lived in Princeton, New Jersey (USA); she remarried. Harry Star and Aura Levine had three children:
  Orrin
  Jonathan
  Ethan
  
  Orrin Star was born on March 23, 1953 in Boston, Massachusetts, USA. He is an award-winning guitarist and mandolin player. He died on November 17, 2017 (in age of 64) in Washington, District of Columbia, USA. I do not know his marital status.
  
  Jonathan Star was born in 1957 in Princeton, New Jersey, USA. He is a writer and translator. In 2012, he lived in Princeton, New Jersey, USA. I do not know his marital status.
  
  Ethan Star tragically died young - was hit by a car at about age of 6.
  
  JENNIE STAR was born on December 23, 1929 in Boston, USA to Marucie Vaysman and Hymen Star. She was named after her grandmother Shendle. On April 15, 1949 (at age 19), Jennie married Norman Waldman (age 21) who was born in 1928. In 2012 Jennie (age 84) and Norman (age 84) still lived in Las Vegas, NV, USA. Jennie Star and Norman Waldman have three children:
  Cheryl Ann
  Allan Jay
  Jordan
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  Cheryl Ann Waldman was born on April 13, 1950. She married and later divorced Charles Noble. In 2012, Cheryl lived in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. Cheryl Waldman and Charles Noble have a son:
  Samuel (born on July 29, 1986 in Las Vegas, USA)
  
  Allan Jay Waldman was born on April 13, 1952 in Winthrop, Massachusetts, USA to Jennie Star and Norman Waldman. He married and later divorce Luisa Fitzgerald. His second wife was Laura Krivan. He is a captain on a sailing charter. In 2012, he lived in Marblehead, Massachusetts, USA. Allan Waldman has three children:
  Kristen Sarah (from the first marriage) was born on December 22, 1980 in USA. She is married to Scott Buck with two children:
  Parker (born on July 13, 2010)
  Hadley Sarah (born in 2012)
  Emma (from the second marriage, born in 1997)
  Jake (from the second marriage, born in 1999 in Marblehead, Massachusetts, USA. In 2012 he was a student at Boston University)
  
  Jordan Waldman was born on October 2, 1956 in USA to Jennie Star and Norman Waldman. He is married to Elizabeth Fitzpatrick, born in 1965. In 2012, they lived in Billerica, Massachusetts. Jordan Waldman and Elizabeth Fitzpatrick have two children:
  Jack (born in 1998)
  Michael (born in 2000)
  
  ANNETTE STAR was born on March 17, 1940 in Boston, USA to Marucie Vaysman and Hymen Star. On June 23, 1963 (at age 23), she married Robert Lustgarten (age 25) who was born in 1938. Annette is an attorney in law. In 2012, Annette (age 72) and Robert (age 75) still lived in Sedona, Arizona, USA. Annette Star and Robert Lustgarten have two children:
  
  Craig Lustgarten born on December 10, 1966 in Boston, Massachusetts, USA. He was named after his grandfather Haim Star. In 2012 he lived in Las Vegas, Nevada and was single.
  
  Pamela Anne Lustgarten was born on February 4, 1969. On December 23, 1995 (at age 26) married David Allen Book (age 28) who was born on January 12, 1967. In 2012, Pamela and family lived in Lynnfield, Massachusetts, USA. Pamela Star and David Book have four children:
  Joshua Alexander (born on March 5, 1998)
  Jared Elijah (born on March 15, 2001)
  Noah Julian (born on June 13, 2003)
  Jacob Ethan (born on October 23, 2007)
  
  HERSHEL (HARRY) VAYSMAN (WHITE) was born on December 1, 1903 in Kishinev to Hoskel Vaysman and Shendle Petrovskiy. After immigrating to USA, Harry changed his last name to White. In 1931 (at age 27), he went back to Kishinev and married Rose Furrer (age 18) who was a cousin from his mother"s site. After marriage, they came back to live in Boston. Harry owned a retail store. He died on January 10, 1976 (age 72) of liver cancer. Harry Vaysman (White) and Rose Furer had two children:
  Saul
  Edward
  
  This is the 1940 USA Census with the information about Harry"s family
  
  1940 United States Federal Census about Harry White
  
  Name:
  Harry White
  Age:
  35
  Estimated Birth Year:
  abt 1905
  Gender:
  Male
  Race:
  White
  Birthplace:
  Romania
  Marital Status:
  Married
  Relation to Head of House:
  Head
  Home in 1940:
  Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts
  Street:
  Stratton Street
  House Number:
  117
  Farm:
  No
  Residence in 1935:
  Same Place
  Citizenship:
  Naturalized
  Occupation:
  Proprietor
  Industry:
  Retail Frant Store
  House Owned or Rented:
  Rented
  Value of Home or Monthly Rent:
  33
  Attended School or College:
  No
  Highest Grade Completed:
  Elementary school, 6th grade
  Hours Worked Week Prior to Census:
  44
  Class of Worker:
  Working on own account
  Weeks Worked in 1939:
  52
  Household Members:
  
  Name
  Age
  Harry White
  35
  Rose White
  27
  Saul White
  7
  Edward White
  1
  
  
  
  
  
  Saul White was born on July 1, 1932 in Boston, Massachusetts, USA. He was a prominent California artist, a poet and a musician. He died on May 20, 2003 (at age 70) in San Pedro, California, USA. I am not sure about his marital history but he had two children:
  Aaron
  Rachel (no information on her)
  
  Aaron White was born on March 7, 1967 in Culver City, California, USA. (His mother"s last name was Keim.) On October 14, 1995 (at age 28), he married Irena Segarich (age 28) who was born in 1967. Aaron is a successful artist. Irena works in cosmetic industry. Aaron White and Irena Segarich have a son:
  Ethan Mirko (born on June 27, 1994 in Los Angeles, California, USA. In 2012 he lived in Denver, Colorado)
  
  Edward White was born on November 25, 1938 in Boston, Massachusetts, USA. In 1940 s, he moved to Los Angeles with his mother. They owned a grocery store and relocated to Miami Beach in the 1970s. I do not know if Edward is still alive, but if so, he would be around 74 in 2012. Edward was married to Glenda (last name unknown). They divorced in 1996. Edward White and Glenda had a daughter Karen:
  Karen White was born on January 30, 1965 in San Juan, Puerto Rico, USA. She lived in Reseda, California, in 1993. She has two daughters with Daniel Lawrence Richmond: Katelyn Michelle (born on June 13, 1992 in Los Angeles, California, married to Alexander Van Zee) and Danielle Lauren (born on February 7, 1996 in Los Angeles, California, USA)
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  MANIA (MARYEM) VAYSMAN was born on June 24, 1908 in Kishinev to Hoskel Vaysman and Shendle Petrovskiy.
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Birth Records, 1829-1910 about Meryem / Miryam Vaysman
  
  Name:
  Meryem / Miryam Vaysman
  Gender:
  Female
  Birth Date:
  24 Jun 1908
  Birth Town:
  Kishinev
  Birth Guberniya (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Father's Name:
  Khaskel / Yekheskel
  Father's Father's Name:
  Elya / Eliyohu
  Mother's Name:
  Sheyndlay-Zelda
  Registration Place:
  Kishinev
  Registration Year:
  1908
  Comments:
  Father from Bendery
  Other Towns Mentioned:
  Bendery
  
  
  
  On March 28, 1928 (at age 19), she married Shmiel Froimovici (Froimovich) (age 18). Shmiel was born on March 28, 1910 in Kishinev to Solomon Froimovici and Rivka Felman. (An interesting fact is that Rivka was the cousin of my grandmother Anna Meites (my father"s mother). In the same year, 1928, Mania and Shmiel immigrated to Argentina (Buenos Aires). Shmiel was a peddler. Mania died in Buenos Aires on March 18, 1985 (at age 76) of liver cancer and Shmiel died on June 24, 1975 (at age 65). Mania Vaysman and Shmiel Froimovici had four children:
  UNNAMED
  ElLIAS
  SIMON
  MIGUEL
  
  UNNAMED boy was born in about 1929, and died two month after birth. The cause of death is unknown.
  ELIAS FROIMOVICI was born on October 13, 1930 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He attended Medical University at Buenos Aires and was involved in the family jewelry business. In 1957 (at age 27), he married Nellie Federman who was working on her Ph.D. in Economics. Elias died in Buenos Aires on August 27, 1999 (at age 68). Elias Froimovici and Nellie Federman had two children:
  Sarita
  Moshe
  
   5.2.1. Sarita (Sara Regina, Rebeca) Froimovici was born on August 13, 1959 in Argentina, to Elias Froimovici and Nellie Federman. She married Alberto Santiago Jolodovsky in Argentina on June 24, 2006. Sarita Froimovici and Alberto Jolodovsky have a son:
  5.2.1.1. Alan Nataniel (born in 2006 in Argentina)
  
  Moshe Jorge Froimovici was born on September 25, 1963 in Buenos Ares, Argentina to Elias Froimovici and Nellie Federman. He is married to Betina Galante (born in 1965). Moshe Froimovici and Betina Galante have a son:
  
  5.2.2.1. Damian Ricardo (born in 1988 in Buenos Aires, Argentina
  
  
  SIMON FROIMOVICI was born on January 5, 1932 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. In 1952 (at age 20), he started a glove factory in Buenos Aires. In 1960 (at age 28), he married Rosita Nauchitel who worked in a bank office. In 2012, Simon (age 80) still lived in Mar del Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Simon Froimovici and Rosita Nauchitel do not have any children.
  
  MIGUEL FROIMOVICI was born on November 22, 1937 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. On November 22, 1963 (at age 26), he married Berths Sharan who touted English. Miguel was a salesperson. He died on December 22, 2012 in Buenos Aires (at age 75). Miguel Froimovici and Berths Sharan had two children:
  Jorge Froimovici was born on August 24, 1964 in Argentina, where he lived in 2012. Jorge have two children:
  Emanuel (birthday unknown, born in Argentina)
  Ariel (born on July 6, 1990 in Argentina)
  Analia Froimovici was born on April 30, 1966 in Argentina. She is married to Marcelo Luis Szajewicz (born in 1963). Analia Froimovici and Marcelo Szajewicz have three children:
  Vanesa Ruth (born May 4 1988, married to Gustavo Morelli, has a son Thiago (July 9, 2013)
  Maxi
  Owen (born July 8, 1995)
  
  SHMIEL (SMOAL) VAYSMAN was born on August 6, 1910 in Kishinev to Hoskel Vaysman and Shendle Petrovskiy.
  
  The birth certificate of Shmuel provides not only his birthday but the information about his marriage as well.
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Birth Records, 1829-1910 about Shmuel / Shmil Vaysman
  
  Name:
  Shmuel / Shmil Vaysman
  Gender:
  Male
  Birth Date:
  6 Aug 1910
  Birth Town:
  Kishinev
  Birth Guberniya (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Father's Name:
  Ykhezkel / Khaskel
  Father's Father's Name:
  Elio / Elya
  Mother's Name:
  Sheindl Zelda / Sheyndlya-Zelda
  Registration Place:
  Kishinev
  Registration Year:
  1910
  Comments:
  Mohel Levi HENHOLTS / Leyvi YENGOLTS. Father from Bendery. Record copied in 1974. Married Rivca Precupet in Kishinev on June 10, 1932 cert. # 288. June 10, 1932 Signed by Civil Registry Officer
  Other Towns Mentioned:
  Bendery
  
  
  
  
  On June 10, 1932 (at age 22), he married Rivka Precupetz, who died of tuberculosis around 1940. Shmiel worked on the fabric factory before the World War II. During the World War II, he served in Soviet Army. In 1945 (at age 35), he married Betya Troychshnayder (age 23) born on September 22, 1922. Unfortunately, Betya died on February 2, 1966 (at age 43) of diabetes. In 1967 (at age 57) Shmiel married Surka (Shura) Nisenblat. In 1973 (at age 63), he and the family immigrated to Israel. Shmiel died in 2009 (at age 98) in Nazareth. Shmiel Vaysman and Betya Troychshnayder have a daughter:
  ANNA
  
  ANNA VAYSMAN was born on December 5, 1946 in Kishinev. In 1965 (at age 18), she married Leonid Fudman (age 23), born on January 20, 1942, who was a photographer. In 1973 (at age 31), Anna with family immigrated to Israel. In 1991 (at age 49), Anna divorced Leonid. He died in 2000 (at age 58). In 2012, Anna still lived in Nazareth and worked as a head nurse in an Ophthalmology clinic. Anna Vaysman and Leonid Fudman had two children:
  Baruch
  Lyuba
  
  Baruch Fudman was born on November 17, 1966 in Kishinev. He was brought to Israel at the age of 7. In 1991 (at age 25), Baruch married Elena Fishbein (age 22) who was born on June 21, 1969. In 2012, they lived in Nazareth. Baruch Fudman and Elena Fishbein have three children:
  Hagay (born on March 28, 1994 in Nazareth)
  Yalin (born on March 27, 1999 in Nazareth)
  Sher (born on December 8, 2005 in Nazareth)
  
  Lyuba (Ahuva) Fudman was born on June 12, 1969 in Kishinev. She was married to Hilik Cohen. They have a son:
  Aviv Cohen (born on May 15, 1994 in Israel)
  
  AVRUM (ABRAHAM) VAYSMAN was born on November 7, 1912 in Kishinev to Hoskel Vaysman and Shendle Petrovskiy. In 1928 (at age 15), he immigrated to Argentina. In 1936 (at age 23), he married Elena (Chaia Hinda) Aplebaum (age 21) who was born on March 31, 1914 in Poland. Avrum became a watchmaker and a jeweler and opened his own store in 1938 (age 25). He died in Buenos Ares on March 18, 1977 (at age 64) of liver cancer. In 2012, Elena (age 98) still lived in Buenos Aires and was the last living person of her generation. Avrum Vaysman and Elena Apelbaum had two children:
  ELIAS
  RACHEL (SHENDLE)
  
  ELIAS VAYSMAN was born on December 1, 1943 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He lived in Rio Cuarto, graduated from the Rio Quarto University and became an accountant. In 1970 (at age 26), Elias married Anna Biasi (age 24) who was born on June 22, 1946 in Argentina and was a teacher. Unfortunately, Anna died in 1991 (at age 44) of cancer. In 2012, Elias lived in Rio Cuarto, Argentina. Elias Vaysman and Anna Biasi have two children:
  Ruth
  Gabriel
  
  Ruth Verónica Vaysman (Vaisman) was born on February 12, 1972 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. She is married to Carlos Alberto Barrionuevo who was born on August 30, 1966. Ruth is a physical education teacher; Carlos is a tennis teacher, and he also works in the Tabaco industry. In 2012, they lived in Rio Cuarto. Ruth Vaysman and Carlos Barrionuevo have three children:
  Ana (born on October 15, 1998 in Buenos Aires, Argentina)
  Julian (born on December 11, 2000 in Buenos Aires, Argentina)
  Manuel (born on December 18 in Buenos Aires, Argentina)
  
  Gabriel David Vaysman (Vaisman) was born on July 18, 1974 in Río Cuarto, Cordoba, Argentina. He is married to Cecilia Bianconi. Gabriel Vaysman and Cecilia Biaconi have two children:
  Andres (born on October 29, 2007 in Argentina)
  Gabriel (born on June 23, 2010 in Argentina)
  
  RACHEL (SHENDLE, EUGENIA) VAYSMAN was born on November 12, 1946 in Buenos Aires, Argentina to Avrum Vaysman and Elena Apelbaum. She was a translator. In 1999, Rachel (age 53) immigrated to Israel. She was married to (and then divorced) Carlos Daye. Unfortunately, Rachel died in Israel in about 2002 (at age 56) of breast cancer. Rachel Vaysman and Carlos Daye had two children:
  Ezequiel
  Giselle
  
  Ezequiel Daye was born on July 23, 1976 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. On October 31, 2012 (at age 36), he married Noa Ben-Shoshan in Tel Aviv, Israel where they still lived in 2012.
  
  Giselle Daye was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina. She is married to Carlos Lozano. In 2012, they lived in Spain (Seville). Giselle Daye and Carlos Lozano have two children:
  Rafael (born in 2011 In Spain)
  Manuela (born in 2012 in Spain)
  
  MORDEKHAY (MONIA) VAYSMAN (WAJSMAN) was born on February 5, 1915 in Kishinev to Hoskel Vaysman and Shendle Petrovskiy. He worked with his father in the mill and also became a shoemaker. In 1940 (at age 25), he married Freda, who was murdered during the World War II. In 1948 (at age 33) Monia went to Poland and married Gertrude Rosenblatt. Monia and Gertrude immigrated to Israel, and then in 1954 (Monya was 39) they immigrated to Argentina (Buenos Aires) to be near Monya"s sister and brother. Monya died in Buenos Aires in about 1989 (at age 74). Monia Vaysman and Gertrude Rosenblatt had a daughter:
  Rachel
  
  Raquel (Rachel) Vaysman (Wajsman) was born on July 7, 1951 in Jerusalem, Israel. She and her husband Jorge Bustos, whom she later divorced, were prosecuted by the Argentinian military dictatorship in 1970-80. Raquel is a psychologist. In 2012, she lived in Carmen de Patagones, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Raquel Vaysman and Jorge Bustos have two children:
  Julia Bustos (born on February 17, 1983 in Argentina)
  Ezequiel Bustos (born on October 15, 1981 in Argentina)
  
  
  RACHEL VAYSMAN was born in about 1919 in Kishinev to Hoskel Vaysman and Shendle Petrovskiy. She was brutally murdered during the World War II in Kishinev in 1942 (at age 23). She was not married.
  
  
  
  
  Miami International Airport, USA. Haskel"s children reunion
  
  
  
  Descendants of Rosya Vaysman
  
  ROSYA (ANEROSYA, HENYA-ROZA) VAYSMAN was born in about 1883 in Bendery to Eliyahu and Rukhl Vaysman. She was named after her grandmother. On July 31, 1903 (at age 20) Anerosya married Yankel Trachtman (age 28) born in about 1875 in Gancheshti, Bessarabia to Aaron and Ester Trachtman.
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Marriage and Divorce Records, 1879-1915 about Yankel Trakhtman
  
  Name:
  Yankel Trakhtman
  Gender:
  Male
  Marriage Date:
  31 Jun 1903
  Town:
  Kishinev
  Gubernia (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Father's Given Name:
  Aron
  Spouse Name:
  Rosya
  
  
  
  Most likely Anerosya and Yankel lived in Gancheshti, where their first child was born, and then moved to Kishinev. Yankel was badly injured during the World War I and died in about 1919 (at age 43). In 1957 (at age 74) Anerosya immigrated to Israel. She died in Tel Aviv on December 9, 1966 (at age 83) from heart disease. Anerosya Vaysman and Yakov Trachtman had six children:
  UNNAMED
  GERSH
  MILKA
  KENYA
  SHIMON
  HAIM
  
  
  
  Rosya, Yankel and their son Gersh, about 1903
  
  UNNAMED GIRL was born on July 12, 1904 in Gancheshti, lived for 5 days and died of convulsions.
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Death Records, 1858-1914 about Trakhtman/Trachtman
  
  Name:
  Trakhtman/Trachtman
  Est. Birth Year:
  abt 1904
  Gender:
  Female
  Age at Death:
  5 Days
  Death Date:
  16 Jul 1904
  Town:
  Kishinev
  Guberniya (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Cause of Death:
  convulsions
  Residence:
  Ganchesht/Hintshest
  Father's Given Name:
  Yankel/Yakov
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  GERSH (GRIGORIY) TRACHTMAN was born on July 19, 1906 in Kishinev to Anerosya Vaysman and Yakov Trachtman.
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Birth Records, 1829-1910 about Gersh Trakhtman
  
  Name:
  Gersh Trakhtman
  Gender:
  Male
  Birth Date:
  19 Jun 1906
  Birth Town:
  Kishinev
  Birth Guberniya (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Father's Name:
  Yankel
  Registration Place:
  Kishinev
  Registration Year:
  1906
  
  
  
  On August 22, 1930 (at age 24), he married Clara (Khaya) Schiff (age 20) who was born on May 13, 1910 in Kishinev to Shabtay and Rivka Schiff from Podberezki.
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  Here is the Clara"s birth certificate that has a comment on her marriage with Gersh Trachtman.
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Birth Records, 1829-1910 about Khaya Schiff / Shif
  
  Name:
  Khaya Schiff / Shif
  Gender:
  Female
  Birth Date:
  13 May 1910
  Birth Town:
  Kishinev
  Birth Guberniya (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Father's Name:
  Shabtay / Shepsel'
  Father's Father's Name:
  Hirsch / Girsh
  Mother's Name:
  Rivka Dvora / Rivka-Dvoyra
  Registration Place:
  Kishinev
  Registration Year:
  1910
  Comments:
  Father from Podberezy [Podberezki, Podberezsk] Record copied on June 2, 1964. Romanian notation: Married to Ghers Trahtman in Kishinev on Aug. 22, 1930 cert. # 414. Aug. 22, 1930 Signed by Civil Registry Officer
  
  
  
  Before 1936, Gersh worked for the Soviet intelligence while Kishinev belonged to Romania. In 1936, his activities were uncovered and to save his life he crossed the border with the USSR. In 1937 (at age 31), he was sentenced by NKVD to 10 years of hard labor and sent to one of the Gulag camps in Krasnoyarsk from where he came back to Kishinev. Gersh died in Kishinev on November 9, 1972 (at age 66) and Clara died on December 24, 1989 (at age 79). Gersh Trachtman and Clara Schiff had three children:
  
  
  STELLA
  MARGARITA
  ANNA
  
  STELLA TRACHTMAN was born on July 13, 1931 in Kishinev. In 1960 (at age 29), she moved to Sevastopol (Ukraine), returned to Kishinev in 1983 (at age 52) and immigrated to Israel with the family in 1991 (at age 59). Stella graduated from the Ship-making Institute in Nikolaev (Ukraine). She married Mikhail Kanchik who was born on December 25, 1930, in Yasi, Romania. (Interestingly, Mikhail"s aunt Zhenya Kanchik was Mark (Motl) Vaysman's wife). Mikhail tragically died in Kishinev on February 15, 1983 (at age 53). In 2012, Stella (age 81) still lived in Tel Aviv. Stella Trachtman and Mikhail Kanchik had two children:
  Alexander
  Alla
  
  Alexander Kanchik was born on March 18, 1959 in Kishinev. He lived in Sevastopol, Ukraine and in 1990 (at age 31) immigrated to Israel. He was married to Kira Masterman, then to Stella Magid. In 2012, Alexander and Stella lived in Tel Aviv. He is a prominent artist. Alexander has four children:
  Michael (from the first marriage, born on December 20, 1999 in Israel; in 2012 she lived in Atlanta, Georgia, USA)
  Shelly (from the first marriage, twin of Sharon, born on December 20, 1999 in Israel; in 2012 she lived in Atlanta, Georgia, USA)
  Sharon (from the first marriage, Shelly"s twin, born on December 20, 1999 in Israel; in 2012 she lived in Atlanta, Georgia, USA)
  Anna Mary (from the second marriage, born on October 28, 2012 in Israel)
  
  Alla (Ella) Kanchik was born on August 27, 1966 in Sevastopol, Ukraine. She is married to Vladimir Kolesnik (born on February 28, 1961). In 1991 (at age 24) Alla"s family immigrated to Israel. She is a fashion designer. In 2012, Alla with her family lived in Ramat Gan. Alla Kanchik and Vladimir Kolesnik have three children:
  Mikhail (born on April 9, 1985 in Kishinev. In 1991 (at age 6), he was brought to Israel. In 2011 (at age 26), he married Yuliya. In 2012, they lived in Ramat Gan.)
  Daniel (born on December 26, 1999 in Israel)
  Milki (born on October 24, 2001 in Israel)
  
  MARGARITA TRACHTMAN was born on August 10, 1948 in Kishinev to Gersh Trachtman and Clara Schiff. She is married to Izya Indilewitsch. In 1989 Margarita (age 41) and her family immigrated to Germany. In 2012, they lived in Berlin. Margarita Trachtman and IzyaIndilewitsch have a son:
  Semen
  
  Semen Indilewitsch was born on May 19, 1970 in Kishinev. In 1989 (at age 19), he immigrated to Germany with his parents. Semen married to Galina Medved (born on September 26, 1971). In 2012, they lived in Berlin and had a family operated laundry business. Semen Indelewitsch and Galina Medved have two children:
  Katrin (born in May 1993 in Berlin)
  Mary Cleire (born in August 2003 in Berlin)
  
  ANNA TRACHTMAN was born on January 15, 1950 in Kishinev to Gersh Trachtman and Clara Schiff. She is married to Abram Serebrinski who was born on June 15, 1950 in Kishinev. In 1979 (at age 29), Anna and her family immigrated to Germany. In 2012, they lived in Berlin. Anna Trachtman and Abram Serebrinski have a son:
  Emil
  
  Emil (Milik) Serebrinski was born on February 12, 1972 in Kishinev. In 1979 (at age 7) Milik was brought to Germany. In April 2006 (at age 34), he married Sarah Klinger (age 27) who was born on June 9, 1978 in Düsseldorf, Germany. In 2012, they lived in Berlin (Germany). Milik owns a business of renting special occasion equipment. Sarah works as a managing director of the orthodox rabbinical seminary in Berlin (the only one seminary in Germany today). Emil Serebrinski and Sarah Klinger have two children:
  Joshua Zwi Serebrinski (born on June 20, 2007 in Berlin)
  Fanny Eliora (born on October 4, 2009 in Berlin)
  Samuel Meir(born in 2017 in Berlin)
  
  MILKA TRACHTMAN was born on August 29, 1908 in Kishinev to Anerosya Vaysman and Yakov Trachtman.
  
  Her birth certificate also contains the information about Palestinian citizenship.
  
  
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Birth Records, 1829-1910 about Milka Trakhtman
  
  Name:
  Milka Trakhtman
  Gender:
  Female
  Birth Date:
  29 Aug 1908
  Birth Town:
  Kishinev
  Birth Guberniya (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Father's Name:
  Yankel / Yakov
  Father's Father's Name:
  Aron
  Mother's Name:
  Rosya
  Registration Place:
  Kishinev
  Registration Year:
  1908
  Comments:
  Father from Ganchesht / Hinchest; Proved Palestinian citizenship by obtaining naturalization certificate no. 13210/937 Int. 10328/938. May 4, 1938 signed by Civil Registry Officer
  Other Towns Mentioned:
  Ganchesht / Hinchest
  
  
  
  In 1929 (at age 21), she immigrated to Palestine. In 1933 (at age 25) she married Arye Hileli (Baylobich) (age 27) born in 1906 in Poland who lived in Palestine sins 1928. They met in the settlement Magdiel that is called HodHaSharon now. Milka died in Israel on March 13, 1984 (at age 76) of lung and heard diseases. Arye died in 1988 (at age 82). Milka Trachtman and Arye Hileli had three children:
  ARIELLA
  HANNA
  MAYA
  
  ARIELLA HILELI was born on November 14, 1933 in Israel. She was married to Zvi Tzabar who was born on January 5, 1934. Ariella was a teacher. She died in Israel on September 6, 2011 (at age 77) of brain cancer. Ariella Hileli and Zvi Tzabar had three children:
  Saleit
  Ram
  Rotem
  
  Saleit Tzabar was born on September 19, 1955 in Israel where she and her family still lived in 2012. She is married to Joseph Koren who is a medical doctor. Saleit is a psychologist. Saleit Tzabar and Joseph Koren have three children:
  Yifat (born on November 27, 1983, in Israel, married to Noam Zimrat, in 2012 they lived in Jerusalem and studded in Hebrew University)
  Ido (born on June 13, 1987 in Zefat, Israel, in 2012 lived in San Diego, USA and worked as a manager of one of the Israel cosmetic company)
  Einat (born on July 23, 1991 in Zefat, Israel)
  
  Ram Tzabar was born on Decmber 6, 1958 in Israel to Ariella Hileli and Zvi Tzabar. He is married to Sory (last name unknown) who immigrated to Israel from Columbia. In 2012, they lived in Ashdod, Israel. Ram Tzabar and Sory have a daughter:
   Stav
  Stav Tzabar was born on December 12, 1986 in Israel. She is married to Doron Fadida. Stav Tzabar and Doron Fadida have two children:
  Lian
  Lior
  
   Rotem Tzabar was born on June 6, 1964 in Israel to Ariella Hileli and Zvi Tzabar. She is married to Zohar Ashkenazi (born 26 February 1957). Zohar is a chemist, working in a mineral water plant. Rotem is an educational adviser in a primary school. In 2012, the family lived in Yesod Amala. Rotem Tzabar and Zohar Ashkenazi have four children:
  Shaked (born on February 11, 1992 in Israel)
  Nufar (born on August 29, 1995 in Israel)
  Shahaf (born on July 21, 1998 in Israel)
  Yaara (born on February 14, 2005 in Israel)
  
  HANNA HILELI was born on June 25, 1939 in Israel to Milka Trachtman and Arye Hilleli. She is married to Boris Pozailov. Hanna Hileli and Boris Pozailov have two children:
  Raz
  Tal
  
  Raz Pozailov was born on June 9, 1961 in Israel. In 2012, Raz lived in Hertsliya. He is married to Irit. Raz Pozailov and Irit have three children:
  Lior (born on August 20, 1989 in Israel)
  Shahar (born on June 24, 1992 in Israel)
  Sahar (born on April 28, 1997 in Israel)
  
  Tal Pozailov was born on April 16, 1968 in Israel. She is married to Yoav Sela. In 2012, they lived in Nir Tzvi. Tal Pozailov and Yoav Sela have three children:
  Adi (born on February 18, 1994 in Israel)
  Omri (born on July 22, 1996 in Israel)
  Inbar (born on April 14, 2005 in Israel)
  
  MAYA HILELI was born on May 1, 1947 in Israel to Milka Trachtman and Arye Hilleli. She is married to Shlomo Nave (born in 1947). Maya worked as a teacher and as an educational inspector on the kindergartens. Shlomo worked in the government (Israel"s land administration). In 2012, they lived in HodHaSharon. Maya Hileli and Shlomo Nave have three children:
  Oren
  Vered
  Tamir
  
  Oren Nave was born on April 6, 1971 in Israel. He is a computer programmer. He is married to Orly (last name unknown). In 2007 (at age 36), Oren moved to Australia. In 2012, he and his family
  lived in Perth (Western Australia). Oren Nave and Orly have two children:
  Shenhav (born in 2000 in Israel)
  Daya (born in 2006 in Israel)
  
  Vered (Rose) Nave was born on June 13, 1974 in Israel. She is a social worker in a hospital. She is married to Oded Malkin (second husband). Vered has two children:
  Idan Laufman (born in 2003 in Israel from the first marriage)
  Yardan (born in 2007 in Israel from the second marriage). Vered also has a stepson from Oded, Elad (born in 2002 in Israel).
  
  Tamir Nave was born on March 6, 1979. He is an electronics engineer. Tamir is married to Vered (last name unknown). Tamir Nave and Vered have a child:
  Shachar (born in 2012 in Israel)
  
  KENYA TRACHTMAN was born on October 15, 1910 in Kishinev to Anerosya Vaysman and Yakov Trachtman.
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Birth Records, 1829-1910 about Kenya Trakhtman
  
  Name:
  Kenya Trakhtman
  Gender:
  Female
  Birth Date:
  15 Oct 1910
  Birth Town:
  Kishinev
  Birth Guberniya (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Father's Name:
  Yaakov / Yankel
  Father's Father's Name:
  Aharon / Aron
  Mother's Name:
  Rosya
  Registration Place:
  Kishinev
  Registration Year:
  1910
  Comments:
  Father from Gancheshty.
  Other Towns Mentioned:
  Gancheshty
  
  
  
  In 1933 (at age 23) she immigrated to Israel and married Aaron Potashnik (age 22) born on August 5, 1911. Kenya died on January 7, 2002 (at age 91). Aaron died on January 21, 2002 (at age 90). Kenya Trachtman and Aaron Potashnik had three children:
  
  
  YEMIMA
  MEIRA
  ISRAEL
  
  YEMIMA POTASHNIK was born on October 29, 1938 in Tel Aviv. On April 5, 1960 (at age 21) she married Israel Ben Zeev (age 23) born on February 27, 1937 in Afula, Israel. In 2012, they lived in Raanana, Israel. Yemima Potashnik and Israel Ben Zeev have three children:
  Shoval
  Shai
  Sagi
  
  Shoval Ben Zeev was born on May 12, 1962 in Petach Tikva. He was married to Yifat Zivilok (born on May 26, 1963). In 2012, Shoval lived in Tel Aviv. Shoval Ben Zeev and Yifat Zilok have two children:
  Maayan (born on May 26, 1989 in Tel Aviv)
  Maor (born on May 26, 1993 in Tel Aviv)
  
  Shai Ben Zeev was born on September 4, 1964 in Petach Tikva. He was married to (and then divorced) Rotem (born on September 5, 1965). On November 16, 1999 (at age 35), he married Atlev Shofet. Shai Ben Zeev has six children:
  
  
  
  
  Avishaq (born on February 17, 1991 in Jerusalem) (from the first marriage)
  Atalia (born on December 25, 1994 in Jerusalem) (from the first marriage)
  Yehoshua (born on September 18, 2000 in Jerusalem) (from the second marriage)
  Rina Kenya (born on October 8, 2002 in Jerusalem), (from the second marriage)
  Aharon Ytzchak (born on December 15, 2003 in Jerusalem) (from the second marriage)
  Haya Sheindel Atara (born on June 8, 2006 in Jerusalem) (from the second marriage)
  
  Sagi Ben Zeev was born on September 22, 1970 in Petach Tikva. On June 18, 1992 (at age 21) he married Orly Kfir (age 22) born on June 9, 1970 in Israel whom he later divorced. In 2012, he lived in Raanana. Sagi Ben Zeev and Orly Kfir have three children:
  Ariel (born on February 27, 1994 in HaMerkaz)
  Gal (born on September 26, 1997 in HaMerkaz)
  Yam (born on September 7, 2001 in in HaMerkaz)
  
  MEIRA POTASHNIK was born on February 15, 1945 in Israel to Kenya Trachtman and Aaron Potashnik. On March 4, 1968 (at age 23) she married Uri Tenzer (age 23) born on January 9, 1945. Meira died in Tel Aviv on March 25, 2006 of pneumonia. In 2012, Uri (age 67) lived in Tel Aviv. Meira Potashnik and Uri Tenzer had two children:
  Nir
  Zohar
  
  Nir Tenzer was born in Israel. He is married to Michal Eldar (born on March 28, 1970). Nir is a pilot. In 2012, they lived in Israel. Nir Tenzer and Michal Eldar have three children:
  Lior (born on October 10, 2001 in Israel)
  Amit (born on July 31, 2003 in Israel)
  Maya (born on September 12, 2007 in Israel)
  
  Zohar Tenzer was born on April 11, 1969 in Israel. On February 25, 1997 (at age 27) he married Orit Ventura (age 26) born on July 16, 1970. Zohar Tenzer is an economist. In 2012, they lived in Givatayim. Zohar Tenzer and Orit Ventura have three children:
  Itay (born on January 6, 2000 in Israel)
  Roni (born on March 31, 2003 in Israel)
  Lihi (born on June 3, 2005 in Israel)
  
  ISRAEL POTASHNIK was born on Mar 27, 1948 in Israel to Kenya Trachtman and Aaron Potashnik. He is married to Susan Roden (born in England). In 2012, they lived in London. Israel Potashnik and Susan Roden have four children:
  
  Shalva
  Ori
  Gili
  Avia
  
  Shalva Potashnik was born on August 13, 1970 in England. She is married to Yosi Elias (born on July 5, 1967) who is a jewelry designer. In 2012, they lived in Raanana, Israel. Shalva Potashnik and Yosi Elias have three children:
  Tomer (born on April 21, 1999 in Israel)
  Inbar (born on April 1, 2003 in Israel)
  Ofir (born on August 9, 2004 in Israel)
  
  
  Ori Joel Potashnik was born on June 30, 1973 in Cuckfield, England. He is married to Eti Canneti (born on December 17, 1977). In 2012, they lived in Tel Aviv, Israel. Ori Potashnik and Eti Canneti have two children:
  Danielle (name can be incorrect) (born in 2006 in Israel)
  Alex (name can be incorrect) (born in 2010 in Israel)
  
  Gili Potashnik was born on May 21, 1976 in Israel. On February 2, 2009, she married James Brazier. In 2012, they lived in Brighton, England. Gili Potashnik and James Brazier have a daughter:
  Maya (born on October 3, 2010 in England)
  
  Avia Potashnik was born on June 29, 1981 in Israel. She is married to Sam Ball. In 2012 they lived in England (Maidstone, Kent).
  
  SHIMON (SAMUEL) TRACHTMAN was born on May 12, 1915 in Kishinev to Anerosya Vaysman and Yakov Trachtman. He was married to Bella Barankin. Like many other relatives, Shimon was a victim of the Soviet political repressions. In 1939 (at age 24) NKVD arrested him, and he spent 7 years in one of the Gulag labor camps. Shimon was an electrician. He died in 1977 (at age 61) by tragic incident at the railway station in Kishinev. Shimon Trachtman and Bella Barankin had a daughter:
  ZHANNA
  
  ZHANNA TRACHTMAN was born on October 13, 1948 in Kishinev. She is married to Boris Portnoy (born on October 13, 1948 in Kishinev). In 1991 (at age 37) Zhanna and her family immigrated to USA. In 2012, they lived in Marietta, Georgia. Zhanna Trachtman and Boris Portnoy have two children:
  Yan
  Anna
  
  Yan Portnoy was born on August 11, 1969 in Kishinev. In 1991 (at age 22), he immigrated to USA along with his parents. In 2012, Yan lived in Marietta, Georgia, USA and was not married.
  
  Anna Portnoy was born on July 1, 1975 in Kishinev. In 1991 (at age 16), Anna"s family immigrated to USA. Anna is married (second marriage) to Alexander Kaushanskiy (born in 1972). In 2012, they lived in Johns Creek, Georgia (USA). Anna Portnoy and Alexander Kaushanskiy have a daughter:
  Samantha (born in about 2000 in USA)
  
  HAIM TRACHTMAN was born on November 22, 1917 in Kishinev to Anerosya Vaysman and Yakov Trachtman. On September 28, 1940 (at age 22) he married Rukhl (Raya) Koyfman (age 20) born on June 14, 1920 in Kishinev. Haim was a cousin of Raya"s mother. Haim died in Kishinev on May 22, 1978 (at age 60) from adrenal cancer. Raya immigrated to Israel in 1991 (at age 70) and died in Tel Aviv on June 10, 2010 (at age 89). Haim Trachtman and Raya Koyfman had to daughters:
  ITA
  ALEXANDRA
  
  Refer to the sections 3.2.1 and 3.2.2 regarding Ita and Alexandra.
  Descendants of Azriel Vaysman
  
  AZRIEL MOISHE (ISRAEL) VAYSMAN was born in 1880 in Bendery to Eliyahu and Rukhl Vaysman. On March 6, 1908 (at age 28), he married Sima Kigel (age 23) born on January 10, 1885 in Kishinev. Sima was a daughter of Yankel and Tsislya Kigel from Kishinev.
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Marriage and Divorce Records, 1879-1915 about Azril Moishe Vaysman
  
  Name:
  Azril Moishe Vaysman
  Gender:
  Male
  Marriage Date:
  6 Mar 1908
  Town:
  Kishinev
  Guberniya (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Father's Given Name:
  Elya
  Spouse Name:
  Sima
  
  
  
  I believe that Azriel moved from Bendery to Kishinev because of this marriage. Azriel (age 64) and Sima (age 59) were murdered in Kishinev ghetto in about 1941. Azriel Vaysman and Sima Kigel had four children:
  GERSH
  PINCHAS
  BARUCH (BORIS)
  SHMIEL
  
  GERSH VAYSMAN was born on May 12, 1910 in Kishinev and died on Jun 13, 1911 (at age 1) most likely from childhood disease.
  
  
  Bessarabia (now Moldova), Death Records, 1858-1914 about Gersh Vaysman
  
  Name:
  Gersh Vaysman
  Gender:
  Male
  Death Date:
  13 Jun 1911
  Town:
  Kishinev
  Guberniya (Province):
  Bessarabia
  Father's Given Name:
  Azril Moishe
  
  
  
  PINCHAS VAYSMAN was born on September 2, 1913 in Kishinev. He was married to Rukhl (Raya) Goldenshtein (born on March 22, 1922 in Kishinev) to Mikhail and Haika Goldenshtein. Pinchas was a victim of Soviet political persecution and spent time in Siberia, were his second child was born. In 1980 (at age 67) Pinchas immigrated to Australia. He died in Melbourne on October 10, 1994 (at age 81) of lung cancer. Rukhl died in Melbourne on March 22, 1999 (at age 76).
  
  JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry (JOWBR) about Pinchus Vaysman
  
  Name:
  Pinchus Vaysman
  Hebrew Name:
  Pinchus Ben Yisrael
  Birth Date:
  2 Sep 1913
  Death Date:
  3 Oct 1994 / 28 Tishri 5755
  Age at Death:
  81
  Burial Date:
  3 Oct 1994
  Burial Plot:
  Section 20, Row V, Plot 17, 1
  Burial Place:
  Melbourne, Australia
  Father Name:
  Yisrael
  Cemetery:
  Melbourne Chevra Kadisha - Springvale
  
  
  Pinchas Vaysman and Rukhl Goldenshtein have two children:
  Simon Vaysman
  Michael Vaysman
  
  Simon (Semyon) Vaysman was born on July 27, 1948 иin Kishinev. He is married to Esther Meleger (born on December 2, 1948 in Kishinev) and works as an engineer. In 1981, Semen (age 33) and his family immigrated to Australia. In 2012, they lived In Melbourne. Semen Vaysman and Esther Meleger have two children:
  Alla
  Gabriella (born on December 14, 1984 in Melbourne, Australia.)
  
  Alla Vaysman was born on February 27, 1976 in Kishinev. She was brought to Australia in 1981 (at age 5). She is married to Tonny Dellanno (born February 13, 1965). In 2012, the family lived in Melbourne. Alla Vaysman and Tonny Dellanno have a daughter:
  Mia (born on May 20, 2009 in Melbourne, Australia)
  
  Michael Vaysman was born on May 17, 1951 in Kemerovo, Tisul (Siberia). He is married to Emma Vaisman (not related despite the similar last name), born on April 1, 1954 in Karpeshty, Moldova). In 2012, the family lived in Melbourne. Michael Vaysman and Emma Vaisman have two children:
  Irene
  Svetlana (Lana) (born on September 14, 1986 in Kishinev).
  
  Irene Vaysman was born on December 7, 1981 in Kishinev. On April 19, 2014 she married John Stevenson. They live in Melbourne, Australia. Iren and John have two children:
  2.2.1.1 Samantha
  2.2.1.2. Kristopher
  
  
  
  
  
  BORUCH (BERL, BORIS) VAYSMAN was born in 1918 in Kishinev. He was murdered in Kishinev ghetto in about 1941 (at age 23). He was unmarried.
  
  Yad Vashem testimony of Boris"s brother Pinchas (in Hebrew)
  
  
  Even though the testimony stated that Boris died in 1944, I am using 1941, because most of the Jews in Kishinev ghetto was murdered in the beginning of the war.
  
  Azriel"s deccendants in Australia establish a memorial, to remember all relatieves died in WW2
  
  
  Melburn, Australia
  
  SHMIEL VAYSMAN was born on December 29, 1909 in Kishinev. He arrived in Uruguay in the Italian ship Conte Rosso in 1929. In 1934 he moved to Argentina where on July 5, 1935 he married Maria Kaner (1912-1985). He died on November 13, 1964 in Argentina. Shmiel and Maria had a son
  Elias.
  
  Elias Vaysman (Weisman) was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He is married to Maria Gorbatoff. Elias and Maria have two children:
  
  Susana (married to Miquel Binker, has two boys)
  Karina (married and have two boys)
  
  Descendants of Velvel Vaysman
  
  WOLF ZEEV (VELVEL) VAYSMAN (WEISMAN) was born in Bendery in 1876 to Eliyahu and Rukhl VAYSMAN. In about 1900 he moved to London, England where he married Toybl (1880-1958, last name unknown, daughter of Moshe). He was a cap maker. He died on August 6, 1949 (at age 73) in Cape Town, South Africa. Wolf and Toybl had two children:
  EVE
  HARRIS
  
  EVE (EVELIN) WEISMAN was born in 1908 in London, England to Wolf and Toybl Weisman. She was married with no children.
  HARRIS (HARRY) was born on July 8, 1909 in London, England to Wolf and Toybl Weisman. Later his family immigrated to South Africa. Harry was married to Sarah Herman (born in London in 1908, died in Cape Town in 1987). He died on April 27, 1997 in Cape Town, South Africa. Harry and Sarah have three children:
  Lionel
  Raphael
  Alec
  
  Lionel Weisman was born on November 14, 1939 in Cape Town, South Africa to Harris and Sarah Herman. He is married to Barbara Weamer (born in 1944). Lionel and Barbara have two children:
  Danny
  Debbie
  
  Raphael Maurice Weisman was born on September 3, 1945 in Cape Town, South Africa to Harry Weisman and Sarah Herman. He is married to Lorrena Russell-Shalev. In Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Raphael and Lorrena has three children:
  Elisha
  Grace
  Joy
  
  2.2.1 Elisha Rowen Weisman was born on September 5, 1975, to Lorenna Russell-Shalev and Raphael Weisman. He married Pasquala Enos on October 11, 2012. They live in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA.
  2.2.2. Grace Oriel Weisman was born in 1979, to Lorenna Russell-Shalev and Raphael Weisman. She was married two times. Grace and her husband Sage Gray Mayhew lived in Santa Fe, New Mexico, in 2019. Grace has two children:
   2.2.1.1. Elias Alexander Oriel (born in 2012, first marriage)
   2.2.1.2. Ajah Anthony (born in 2015, second marriage)
  2.2.3. Joy Weisman was born in 1981 to Lorenna and Raphael Weisman. She died as a child in 1990.
  
  Alec Weisman was born in 1950 in Cape Town, South Africa, to Harris Weisman and Sarah Herman. He died in 2003 in Israel at the age of 53.
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  Chapter 3. Family Memoirs
  
  Before the World War II
  Life in Kishinev (from Yuliy Vaysman"s memoirs)
  I remember Grandfather Mendel who was a strong and respectful man. He led the family clan, and the rest of the family grouped around him. Every Saturday, all the relatives would seat together around the huge table and grandmother Yekheved, who was taller than her husband,, would stand near him with a bottle of wine that Grandpa Mendel drank after he did the prayers on the bread. Then he would wipe his moustache and Shabbat began. I remember how the table was full of massive geese and turkeys, fish, and pastrami, all cooked by my Grandma and numerous relatives participating in the meal. Grandpa Mendel was a merchant. He bought grain from Moldavian farmers and sold it to the mills. Grain was delivered on big wagons and left in a huge barn in the back yard. This yard was located side by side with my mother family"s yard. Grandpa Mendel established very good relationships with the farmers. When they would bring grain, he fed and treated then with wine. This granted him their respect. He was very religious and belonged to the synagogue that stood across the road.
  
  My father graduated from a Jewish school that coincidentally was named after someone named Vaysman. He started to help Grandpa Mendel in his business. He bought and sold grain to the mills. At some point, Grandpa, wishing further his son"s education, sent him to Vienna Polytechnic Institute that my dad had not finished for an unknown reason. He came back to Kishinev, and continued working as a trader. When time came to serve in the Romanian army, Grandpa Mendel took advantage of the law that allowed him to pay off his son"s service. He gave the senior officer the money and a horse, and my dad became a second lieutenant and released from the duty. However, this ridiculous episode played an ill joke with my father later, when the Soviet authorities charged him with espionage based on his service in the Romanian army that actually never happened.
  
  The Meites and Vaysman families lived side by side, and after my parents got married, they stayed in Meites house where I was born in 1928. When I was three, we moved from the Meites" house to the 2-bedroom apartment on Prunkulovskaya Street in the yard of Mr. Katz. In this apartment, my brother Yefim (Haim) was born in 1934. Soon after, we moved to the 4-bedroom apartment on the second floor in the same building. At the age of four Yefim fell from the second floor window. It seems that he lost his balance when I was watching for him but turned away for a moment. I managed to grab his leg, but he still fell - directly into the flowerpot, which obviously softened the fall leaving only his shoe in my hand. I ran outside and brought him home. Luckily, uncle Kopel had just walked past and he called Dr. Urbanovich, the family doctor. Except for the scar, the fall had not led to any other consequences, which significantly diminished the sense of guilt I experienced after this accident.
  
  As a child I remember having a nanny Nastya. Nastya often took me to the Pushkin Park where she would meet with a young priest. According to my mother, I had curly hair and wore fashionable sailor suits during those times.
  
  Having the opportunity to move to a more prestigious area, my father chose the central part of Gogol Street, opposite of the famous Cathedral and the Triumphal Ark, established in honor of the Russian victory over Napoleon in 1812. It was a type of middleclass apartment with four bedrooms and my mother"s piano in one of them. Renting this apartment meant that my father had reached a certain level in his commercial activities. My mother always had a maid and we lived happily until 1940, when the Soviets arrived in Bessarabia.
  
  Our host was Austrian. She fed us enormous number of dishes for breakfast, lunch and dinner. I still see freshly baked sweets served with tea and diversity of other stuff. Hiking in the mountains, we met my geography teacher, Mr. Chekira, who questioned me about my summer homework preparation.
  
  Every day we went to the railway station to buy a newspaper. On one occasion, I saw a train platform loaded with German tanks. I clearly remember black swastika painted on a green background. The military train headed south and my father decided to come back home immediately. To the surprise of my mother, we were back the next day. She met us at the door holding my little brother Yefim.
  
  I also remember another episode from 1940 when the Romanian newspaper was lying on my father"s desk showing a huge printed portrait of a man with the inscription: "The famous Russian revolutionary leader Leon Trotsky was killed in Mexico". In addition, I recall reading news about the war in Spain.
  
  On 28 of July 1940, we witnessed the entry of the Soviet troops into Kishinev. Majority of the people came to this event, as it was a celebration. We sat at the table on Alexander"s (now Lenin"s) street, and watched how the Soviet tanks came from the east as the Romanian cavalry and infantry were living to the west. Not a single shot was made. Later I learned that the Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact had secret chapters where Bessarabia was given to the Soviet Union. At the same time, the Soviet Union had annexed Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia. Boys, including myself, climbed the tanks, lovely Soviet soldiers wearing black helmets gave us coins, someone from the crowd was throwing flowers but petty bourgeoisie like my father understood what this might lead for them to. In the evenings, mobile cinema was showing the Soviet blockbuster "Chapaev". Boys sitting on the floor watched this amazing movie with amazement. Later I was fortunate to see the 'Three tankers" ("Три танкиста") and "Battleship Potemkin" ("Броненосец Потёмкин").
  
  All of this took place in the summer of 1940 not hinting anything bad yet. However, the Soviet power in Bessarabia was true to itself, arrests and repressions had begun.
  
  Before the Soviets, my father worked for a grain processing company. Soviets put him in a manat agement position in the same type of business ("Zagotzerno"). He had been actively involved in the work but all this suddenly stopped due to a fouls envious accusation by his former school friend. My father learned about it in Moscow where he was taken after the arrest.
  
  As a side note, I want to give a little more time to my dad"s life under the Romanian authority. While Leyb Vaysman had been moving along hierarchical ladder in his business, he had also moved from the less to more prestigious areas of the town. In 1940, we lived in the central part of Kishinev. My father was an elected member of the stock exchange giving him certain privileges: using sleigh ride in wintertime, watching movies in the "Odeon" cinema from a personal balcony, etc.
  
  I recall how the same movie would be playing non-stop all day long, and the people were guided to their sits with a flashlight. Here is an interesting episode related to that cinema. I just finished the 4th grade of the primary school which (located on the street of Stephan the Great across from the Pushkin"s park) and was enrolled in the first grade of the gymnasium (middle school) of Mihai Eminescu, the famous Moldavian poet. The high school boys were the petty bourgeoisie and their tuition fees were lower than those of the Lyceum (higher educational facility) students. The students of gymnasiums and lyceums were forbidden from attending the public places after 7 pm even it they were accompanied by there parents. One day my mom ignoring the rule took me to "Odeon" where the movie "Robinson Crusoe" was playing. We entered the hall accompanied by controller"s flashlight and after seeing one part of the film shockingly discovered, that my school principal was sitting next to us. He looked at my mom and me so she understood that tomorrow she would have to visit the school for an apology.
  
  Now let"s go back to the fate of my father. In the early spring of 1941, we heard a knock on the door. The strict male voice said that it was our neighbor. The first person who entered the room was indeed one of our neighbors who, as it turned out later, worked for the NKVD (The People's Commissariat for Internal Affairs). Then the people in uniform followed. They showed the search and arrest warrants. You can imagine my parents anxiety at that moment but we, the children, were little aware of what was going on. Our apartment was searched and my father was taken away. The next morning my mother ran for help and advice to my uncle"s wife Esther but it turned out that her husband David Vaysman was arrested the same night.
  
  I recall how we were brining parcels to the prison where Grigoriy Kotovskiy, a famous Soviet military leader and communist activist was once held under tsar. (Coincidently we lived across from that prison after the war.) Having lost my father"s income, my mother started to work from home making embroidery for customers. We were strongly supported by my grandfather Mendel and uncle Copel. Half a year has remained before the German invasion. All attempts to get any information about my father were failing. Only later from his own words, we learned that after a few months in Kishinev prison he was transferred to Moscow where the trial was held. He was found guilty an "enemy of the people", the infamous section 58 of the Soviet criminal law charged with the economic counter-revolution.
  
  The charges caused a natural question on how he might had participated in the counterrevolution activities while living in another country. The officials replied that he was robbing the peasants as a capitalist, and served as a Lieutenant of the Romanian army. My father refused to sign the indictment, but he was told about a possibility of torture (putting needles under his fingernails), and so he signed. This terrible truth I learned from my father but my mother never knew the details. At Butyrskaya prison in Moscow, he accidentally saw his brother and realized that David was facing a similar fate.
  
  Dad and Uncle David were sentenced to 8 years in Siberian camps and sent to the town of Verkhoturie where temperatures dropped to -60 degrees Celsius. At first, my father carried out the most difficult work (trees logging) on equal terms with all the prisoners. After the war began, the camp started to produce skis for the soldiers. Given his profession and leadership skills, camp authorities had transferred my father into the office position where he performed clerical work. Person in charge of the zone was very ferocious but a fair general. At the end of the fourth year he called my father and said that he intended to save his life because he will not survive any longer due to poor health and inability to do hard physical labor. He sent him to the doctor. My father visited the doctor who gave him a silk thread with an advice to smoke it on the eve of the Medical Commission from Moscow. The Commission came once a year and was the only hope for the early release. The doctor warned that my father will feel strong heartbeats after smoking but he had to bear. Dad followed the advice and stood in front of the Commission consisted of five professors-therapists. One of them listened to the father"s heart, spoke with the other doctors, and then my father was informed that his health no longer allowed him to stay in the camp, and he would be released.
  
  Uncle David participated in the grandfather Mendel"s business to a lesser extent than my father Leyb Vaysman did. As a handsome young man, he liked to be surrounded by beautiful girls, among which was his future wife Ester Brokhman. Ester and David had a daughter Bima (Biana), my cousin, who lives in Israel with her family. The fate of my
  Uncles were similar to the fate of my father: they were arrested by the Soviets.
  In the beginning of the World War II, Uncle David was sent to Siberia for the so-called
  economic counter-revolution. After serving his years in exile, he was released for good
  behavior (simple luck), and settled in Lvov, Ukraine, where his family lived at that time.
  
  Let"s turn to the memories of Bima Shapiro: "My father was taken in 1941. He was arrested by the NKVD for Zionist activities. According to him, he was a "Maccabi" community activist. This Kishinev organization actively supported the return of the Jews to Israel, and he helped people move to Palestine with forged documents. He served in Siberia (Solikamsk, Komi ASSR) for more than 6 years. In the harsh conditions of survival, he froze his legs and suffered from this until the end of his life. He came back without the right to live closer than 101 km from large cities. (An interesting coincidence: my father was released and died years later on the same day, the 9th of May, the Victory holiday in the Soviet Unit. In 1999, he immigrated to Israel along with his wife.
  
  Copel Vaysman, my father"s youngest brother, was not repressed by the Soviets. However, his personal life had been very dramatic. He was married three times. His first wife Rosa was from a wealthy family. Rosa and Copel lived near us on Pavlovskaya Street. I remember a comfortable mansion with beautiful furniture. Rosa spent the World War II in Kishinev ghetto but survived with help of a doctor who worked in the area. Sadly, Kopel"s daughter Tanya was killed in ghetto at age of eight. After the war Rosa did not retured to Kopel, she married the doctor with whom she was in the ghetto. Soon, they were represted and sent to Sibiria where Rosa had a boy who did not survive.
  
  Uncle Copel, together with my father, worked at the "Zagotzerno" firm (grain business). He met there his second wife Maria. Uncle Copel and Maria lived on Pirogov Street. Their daughter Eva graduated from Leningrad Medical University. Unfortunately, Maria who was severely ill, died on the eve of her daughter"s wedding.
  
  Kopel"s third wife Leah worked as a salesperson in the prestigious supermarket on Lenin Street and supplied all the relatives with shopping goods. Copel also worked in a grocery store on the Kostyuzhenskiy"s highway. Leah was apparently one of our distant relatives. Kopel and Leah lived on Inzov Street, near the Pushkin Museum.
  
  Leah had three sons from her first marriage. The younger son dated the Kishinev chief of police"s daughter and was killed under unclear circumstances. The two older brothers immigrated to the United States. After the death of Aunt Leah, Uncle Copel was left alone. He lived near my cousin Galya, who visited to help him. One day nobody responded to her knock at the door. Copel"s gypsy neighbors broke the door and found him seated in a chair near the TV, dead. His lonely death and complicated life deserve pity and sympathy.
  
  To end the story on a high note, I will tell you that the Vaysman brothers loved soccer and together with the children and even the wives, they did not miss a single game at the Kishinev Stadium. Uncle David and I rooted for Tbilisi Dynamo, my brother Fima rooted for Moscow Dynamo, Uncle Copel for Spartak, and we all rooted for Kishinev Burevestnik (Thunderbird).
  
  War Stories
  
  Many of our relatives tragically died during the World War II. They were brutally killed, died from hunger and diseases in evacuation, or were lost without a trace among 6 million other Holocaust victims and tens of millions Soviet citizens perished in the war. We shall never forget them.
  
  According to our family statistics, we lost 14 relatives during the war, not counting spouses and extended family members, with whom this number would double at least. In this chapter, I have included my father"s memoirs and the stories I heard from the other relatives.
  Mendel and Leyb Vaysman Family War Ordeal (from Yuliy Vaysman"s memoirs)
  On June 22, 1941, we woke up early in the morning from glass cracking up of bombs on the Boulevard. I remember low-flying German aircraft with black crosses on the fuselage age, giving off a wild breathtaking buzz. Many black dots of bombs were scattered down the aircraft. Terrified, I called out my grandmother: "Pray God! '
  
  Despite the fact that the impact of the German troops fell on Minsk and Leningrad, and on the southern front, there had been no breakthroughs, we were able to survive in war conditions until July 16, 1941. During this period, my mother managed to obtain a certificate for evacuation. In order to get this certificate we stood in long turns and hid from bombing in trenches on the territory of my school.
  
  We often stayed with my grandfather at the Vesternicheny rail station. The missile shots were visible in the night sky, and lonely German planes appeared after. During one night attack, Grandpa Mendel popped out in white night lingerie. Granny Heyved shouted: "What are you doing? They will notice you! '
  
  On July 16, we stayed in the Uncle David"s basement, along with his family. The explosions have shaken the city. Kishinev had been burning; the Soviets blew up everything that could undermine. We woke up early in the morning from knocking in the basement door and I heard Grandma Heyved screaming insanely: "Why are you sleeping? City burns, everybody run on the station's last passenger train. You should immediately leave. Run to the station! '
  
  We understood that we would have to leave the city or remain in obscurity. My mother, wanting to save the children, did not hesitate, and we grab the prepared in advanced bags with everything that could be taken away. Very special to me was the postal stamps collection which I kept in the pocket of me jacket.
  
  My mother Anna, my little brother Yefim, who was 6 years old, grandmother Ceytl Meites and I ran to the station and stopped at the last car of the train. Train was ready to leave the crowded platform. There was a soldier with a machine gun blocking the way. My mother begged: "I had kids! ', but the soldier was immovable. At the very last moment, a Lieutenant appeared in the doorway of the train. It was my school principal. "What are you doing here, Vaysman?" - He asked. "My mom answered for me: "we had evacuation papers, and would like to leave, but the soldiers did not let us '. Then we heard the command: "Let them go! '. The soldiers stepped back, and we were in the train.
  
  Grandpa Mendel and grandma Heyved were with us at the station but refused to leave Kishinev like many other people who believed that nothing bad would happen upon arrival of the Germans.
  
  I remember meeting my cousins and other relatives in that train which was our salvation because the city soon was invaded by German and Romanian military troops. All those who did not had time to escape, or decided to stay and up in a ghetto. Most of them did not survive.
  
   I was told my grandmother Heyved, who later joined us in evacuation, it was not possible to stay in Kishinev any longer - the city was in flame, and people started walking away to the East. Grandpa and Grandma were among them even though they hoped that the war will end soon, and they will come back. In a rush, Grandpa forgot his Tales. He commended to his wife to keep going, and returned to the house, intending to catch up with her as soon as possible. They never saw each other again. I was told that Mendel Vaysman was last seen in Odessa, begging on the streets. He disappeared without a trays and all attempt to find him during and after the war was unsuccessful.
  This story inspired my daughter to write a poetry (translated from Russia into English by her husband Michael Romm):
  
  A grandma with her grimy suitcase.
  A stooping, as if pious, old man
  Who forgot his Talmud on the piano
  Between the papers and the other books...
  Howling airplanes above and shouting people around
  The last echelon at the terminal.
  - You shall go alone without me,
  For God commends me to come back.
  So he returned. The moist was heavy
  And full of aches from the flames,
  Solders" hardhats were streaking off
  In the burning Kishinev...
  
  The old man, a beggar lost on the city streets,
  Hungry, thirsty and lonely.
  (His wife will freeze to death, a refugee in Kazakhstan,
  Saving her wrap for the grandson.)
  The fable says, the old man vanished
  In the occupied town of Odessa
  With his thoughts all about God
  Who could save none of them after all.
  
  April 20, 2010
  
  Therefore, our train slowly exited the burning city. Soldiers blew up telegraph poles and railway tracks after we pass them. Slow moving, the train passed Bendery, Tiraspol and safely arrived to Odessa.
  
  We were not able to stop thinking about what happened to the grandparents and Uncles" fsmilies. We did not know if they had managed to evacuate because only us possess the evacuation documents. In Odessa, we were ordered to leave the train and travel further to the East by ourselves, since Odessa was overwhelmed with chaos and confusion.
  
  Our family along with few others climbed an open railway wagon, covered with tarp. To our surprise, this train moved very quickly. Enemy aircrafts circled the sky, but Soviet aircrafts was not been seen. We had considered ourselves rescued, but soldiers who guard the shipment, notify us that wagons transport the bomb, and if the plane finds shoots, and us we will be killed.
  
  I should say that we were not feel any fear yet because we did not yet know what death in the war means. On this dangerous train we, stored by the fate, arrived to the Voznesensk, bought tickets for a passenger train in which we passed the whole southern Ukraine, Krivoy Rog, Zaporozhye, and finally arrived at Bataisk, where the officials took as off the train as refugees and fed for the first time.
  
  I remember the Ukrainian people, who delivered food to the train, and it seemed to me that the war would last a few weeks, that revolution will take place in Germany and we will return unharmed in Kishinev. I was literate well enough for my years, so I could read the newspapers and understand that the Germans were moving to the East, that they already took Kishinev, Odessa, Lvov and Minsk and that we had to flee. I think it also played a role in our salvation, as many evacuees settled in different places, not wanting to move anywhere anymore, because they believed in a quick end to the war.
  
  After Bataisk, we were transferred of Salk and Proletarsk - southern district of Rostov region, where we had temporarily settled in the "Budeniy" farm with river Manych nearby. Don Cossacks who lived there took us friendly. My mother went to work at the farm. My brother Fima was admitted to kindergarten. I was also sent to kindergarten solely for food even though I suppose to go to school. Somehow we meet there my cousins and Grandma Heyved who also joined a group of evacuees.
  
  In "Budeniy", we lived pretty well: we were fed, it was summer and it was warm. However, one night, when the situation on the front deteriorated, as I knew from newspapers, somebody knocked the door and terrible voice ordered to tell the location of the farm primary adding: "if not tell, I will shoot '. We thought it was saboteurs and aunt Chana (I think she was one of the relatives) cried: "lie down on the floor! "She shouted that we know nothing and even though those intruders did not do any harm we were lying on the floor for a long time and could not recover of fear.
  
  After that incident, the woman decided to evacuate from these places, despite the seeming prosperity. We did not know where to go, because the authorities were not interested in our future anymore. The only railway branch from Proletarsk went northeast towards Stalingrad. My mother confidently changed one of my father"s suits for the bag of bread. Along with bread we grabbed a bag of onions, because it was nothing earls to grab in the house. Then my mother hired a man, and he drove us to the Proletarsk rail station, where we and other evacuees unnoticeably at night plunged on the railway platforms with coal. By that time, we ran out of money and used items of the wardrobe as money equivalent.
  
  We placed our Grandmothers in the passageway; boys were sitting right on the coal - messy and dirty. So, with the help of God, once again rescued, we moved to Stalingrad. The train was traveling with long stops, we toke coal, bred fires, and women cooked soup. At the Kotelnikovo station, we had to leave the train, because it was the last stop. We slept on park benches and we ran out of bread and onions.
  
  Being the eldest among the boys, I walked them on the platform were the steady stream of the Stalingrad military echelons ran to the front. It was the end of the autumn of 1941. I knew from the books how armored train looks like and unmistakably recognized it when it drove to the station. Unexpectedly, the military person, whose face seemed familiar, came out of that train. We got closer and I heard: "Vaysman, is that you? "You can imagine my surprise when I found out that a Senior Lieutenant was ones again the principal of my school Georgiy Zacharovich! I explained that we stuck in Kotelnikovo, not knowing what to do, that my mother is changing things for food and that we live in the park. He asked whether we had bread or money. After receiving a negative reply, G.Z. disappeared in the train, and a minute later popped out with two loafs of bread and 30 rubles in single bill.
  Giving those to me, he said that this is all he can give. Tell your mother to evacuate immediately '. As I realized later, it was a time when the Germans marched on Stalingrad, being somewhere between the Don and Volga rivers.
  
  Soon the cold season came. We were recruited for the building of defenses in the town of Abganerovo, 100 km south of Stalingrad. The pay, food and warm clothes were promised. I remembered a warm cozy room, where we stayed. Every morning mom and I went to dig trenches. I must say that this was not a simple trench human height tall, but an anti-tank ditch, that was shuffled by a machine, and our task was to take the soil out. I remember a vast number of people brought from Stalingrad, mostly Soviet academics, in hats, berets, dressed as townspeople, mostly older men and very young women. The Focke-Woolfs buzzed above us, but did not dropped bombs. Obviously, it was a military photography.
  
  Shortly, the work was finished, the winter comes and we moved to a cheaper apartment. Money was gun, the meal too. I recall sitting in a barn at night, hungry, looking for a single wheat grain on the floor. Understanding, that this could not last longer, a group of evacuees had asked the authorities who had proposed moving for winter to Kalmyk farm Tibitkinerovo for possible job. For a while, we forgot about the war, because the main thing now was to survive.
  
  After throwing the last loot into the sani (winter carriage pulled by horses) and seated the grandmothers and us, kids, my mother took off. It was a terrible cold and blizzard started. Soon I lost sight of walking behind as mother and other women. We had a warm piece of fabric that mom bought ones to sew a coats for my father. Seeing my grandmother Heyved, which was easily dressed and, guessing that she is cold, I tried to cover her with that fabric, but she looked at my little brother and said: "Make him and yourself warm, I will be fine'. Granny Heyved passed away in front of my eyes, but I was unaware of this until we arrived in the village, and men who meet us told me about it. We unloaded the carriage and my grandmother was taken somewhere. After a while my mom came. Who, how and where buried Grandma, I do not know.
  
  It was no job in the village. I remember that we all stay in one room. I was only one man among us, elderly shoemaker, whose all wealth was a bag of wooden shoe-pads. It was an iron furnace with chimney in the room, but suffering of chilling weather, we had no wood or coal to make us warm. Desperate woman offered him to burn the pads. An elderly man stood on his knees and bagged not to do it, but we had no other choice. His pads keep us from freezing for several days. When it became quite unbearable, we retune back to Abganerovo where we decided to go further on Stalingrad.
  
  By that time, we ran out of food again. While walking on the trail station platform, I fainted and the standing nearby solders brought me to the waiting room. My mother realized that it was from hunger. She took something of our diminishing belongings, came back with bread, cut the loaf, and gave a piece to all. But, it seems that the grandmother Ceytl realizing that she will not survive in her old at age, refused to eat, adding: " I'm not hungry, give this to children '. Shortly after that, my grandma quietly and unnoticeably went to another world. Only many years later, reviewing this episode, I realize that she, as well as grandmother Heyved, sacrificed themselves so that we children were alive. When I asked my mother, how she buried her grandmother, she told that recruited two young boys, gave them the last item of cloth, and they drove her on sled and buried at night.
  
  I admire the courage and sacrifice of the women of our family. Let them rest in peace! They will be always in my heart.
  
  So, we were moving to the Northeast. The platform of Abganerovo was full of people. We were waiting for the occasional passenger train "Rostov-Stalingrad'. By inhuman effort my mother got tickets and was able to make completely strangers to put on a train which stood on that station no longer than three minutes. I remember how we raised Fima above the heads of other passengers, how my mother pushed herself through and how I climbed up by myself. I had a bag with shoes in my hands. Finding ourselves in the train, we breathed a sigh of relief and were ready for another unknown.
   In Stalingrad, I jumped off the train first, dropped my bag on the ground and turned to my mom, to help with Fima. While I was busy, someone stool our bag with precious winter footwear.
  
  At the station, which later will be remembered in a history as one of the last strongholds of the defenders of Stalingrad, was an agency for evacuees. Mom has shown our already turned into pieces evacuation certificate and we were given food stamps for several days ahead and direction to the hospital which was located in the school. It was the end of the 1941. The Germans attacked. Putting aside the assault on Moscow, they were bursting to the Caucasus and Baku oil. Paulus army moved on Stalingrad and Volga river wonting to cut the resource supply for the center of the country.
  
  Life in Stalingrad was a paradise for us because we were fed and had a place to take a shower. My friend and I spent time in the empty local school, checking the exhibits, library and reading books at night at the empty classrooms.
  Stalingrad is located on the hills, and when we were taken to a pubic bathing place t, the miserable bus barely climbed uphill and it seemed to me that we will broke loose and smash - the small hill grew up in my imagination to huge mountain.
  
   When my mother was admitted to the hospital with typhus, Dr. Lunda convinced her not to worry about the children. Her beautiful curly hair was shaded and coming of the typhoid delirium she wave to us from the window. Then Fima fell ill of dysentery, and he was admitted to the general hospital. Later he was transferred to the children's ward due to the complication with his kidneys. I was left alone.
  At the beginning of 1942, authorities began to move refugees to the left bank of the Volga River (former Republic of the Germans in the Volga region). These territories were not in use, as the Germans were evicted from there in the beginning of the war, to Siberia and Central Asia. I was about to send along with other refugees, despite my refusal to leave my mom and brother, but on the way to a ruthless officials stood Dr. Lunda. Instead of separating the family, he sent me to the hospital ward were we sleep on one bad until our mother were able to take care of us. This Solomon decision of the stranger saved me from separation from the family, and very likely saved my life.
  This is how my daughter, Ella Romm pictured this scene in her poetry (translated from Russian into English by her husband Michael Romm):
  
  Mom"s head is shaved bald.
  I am thirteen plus.
  My little brother and I are playing with sand
  Next to the typhus barrack.
  Later my brother is also hospitalized,
  And the whole world is turning dark.
  I"ll be alone and lost in the wasteland,
  Won"t I? It seems I will.
  The doctor, huge and gloomy
  In his blood-spotted robe,
  Puts me, yet free of typhus,
  On one bed with my little brother.
  I am scared to the teeth,
  I am trembling in the wind
  On the refugee"s path
  I was toddling, clumsy teen.
  Then the sun is dawning red,
  The sky is opening full with the silky herds...
  
  We were all miraculously healed,
  We were very lucky kids.
  
  April 16th, 2010
  
  During our hospital stay, several children from Leningrad were admitted to our ward. Even now, being a doctor and seeing many malnourished children especially in the early years of work, I cannot describe those unfortunate kids who had just skin, bones and deep-set dark eyes. I still remember the horrifying picture of one Leningrad man I will never forgot. He looked exactly like those miserable kids. He pulled bunch of money from his pocket and asked a nurse to buy a chicken and cook him a soup. Most likely, he knew that he is dying and wanted to die well fed. After a few hours, at night, apparently violating the doctor"s order the nurse came with a pot. She invited the poor man from the adult ward and offered him a meal. He did not even eat a half when he fell on his side and died right in front of me. This scene is in my mind, and I tell it, as one of the worst episodes of my Stalingrad life, because it was a time when I realized, what death is.
  
  My mother recovered, and after a few months in the spring of 1942, officials moved us to the city of Palasovka that located on the left bank of the Volga River. We were brought to stay in a house with no glass on the windows. It was not possible to survive in such condition in the area with severe winds and sand storms, and the authorities moved us further. In addition, the Germans were already in Stalingrad, and we cannot stay in the frontline area. Therefore, we were put in cattle cars (wagons for livestock). Very slowly, we moved through Orenburg, Chelyabinsk and further to North Kazakhstan. In Petropavlovsk, we were placed in a passenger train to Bulaevo where the farm wagons waited for us. We were brought to Vozvishenskiy sovkhoz (collective farm) along with a few families from Kishinev.
  
  Our family was taken to a remote village, where we spent two years prior to the arrival of my father. I become a friend with a girl Rosa because our families were place to stay together. Mom worked various jobs: she brought water for the farm animals from a remote well, worked at grain field with other women at field mill, milked cows, nursed the bulls, and I tried to help her around. In was an elementary school at the village, so Rosa and I were admitted to the four's grade in order to receive a portion of bread and a bit of sugar.
  
  I want to tell about an episode, which ones again was a miracle in the name of my salvation. In May, when not the all snow yet melted, we drove on bulls hay for livestock. After driving a long distance from the farm, we loaded a load of straw on the sled and set back. I was going on last sled because the local children took over evacuates. Suddenly right from the blue the enormous power storm had begun: everything spun, moved, we got lost and did not know what to do. I curled up in straw, waiting for the decision of the older children. I was not scared; it was so cold that I only thought about how to warm myself. After quick chat, local children put the oldest bulls headed. The storm was continued with demonic power, which was not typical even in Siberia. Evidently, I fell asleep and woke up when the sled entered the farm. The old bulls who had found a way saved six children, despite the cruel storm. Not everyone was as lucky as we were. Later I learned that the part of a herd, together with the shepherds, entered the lake and drowned.
  
  Every morning my mother had to bring a barrel of water to the farm. Water sled could not be left in the cold, because water could freeze and break a barrel. However, what we the townspeople could understand in this unusual for us business? One evening we went to get water on heavy frost. Horse heavily breathed, bunches of icicles was hanging from the nostrils. After filling the barrel with water, we had to go back immediately, but the horse began to get nervous, pounding hooves and stood still. There was the awful silence, suddenly we heard a howl, and in the dark, I saw bright lights. We immediately realized the presence of wolves. My mother decided to go back to the farm. We had to save the horse and ourselves so we left the sled with the barrel along taking the horse by the bridle. The foreman, seeing us back without water asked about the barrel. My mother explained the situation with wolves emphasizing that we rescued a horse that was frightened not less than we were, but the foreman replied that he has no water to for the cows. He made us turn back before the barrel is not frozen solid. Fortunately, wolves were gone, as were our fear. This time we had not relied on the horse, but rather pushed the sled ourselves in order to return back as fast as possible. By the way, this was the only one water barrel on the farm.
  
  As I said before, all our winter footwear was stolen in Stalingrad. During summer, I walked barefoot, but at fall when we were taking care of grain, suddenly kicked the snow and to warm my feet, I had to dip them into the grain. Then I ran home weeping, and told my mother that can no longer go to work without shoes. My mother went to the farm officials. The head of the farm was exiled Trotskyist (was exiled for belonging to extreme left-wing political ideology). He explained politely that there are no shoes and only thing he can help with is to give us a bit of syromyatina (raw leather) from which, if properly tailored, we can create an onuchi or postoli (primitive native shoes). My mother returned home with a roll of syromyatina, and together with our neighbors, they sewed some resemblance of shoes for the children.
  
  In the house, we and other families rented a place we had a piece of land on which we planted potatoes - our only available food that time. Before go to work we cooked a bucket of potatoes, which we had on the day.
  
  When the release of the crop began, my mother and I were sent to the elevator for the cleaning of grain from impurity. There I drew my attention to women who steal the grain, hiding it in their bloomers. Noticing my mother"s surprise, one of the women asked why she is not wearing pants. The next day me mother came on her duty in dad"s pants and tucked into stockings. Of course, we did not know what Stalin used to put people who hid grain from government to prison. The desire to live and need to feed the children was above all, and my mother took that risk without any doubt. The woman who rented the place gave us a tool to mill the grain and sitting on the floor with Fima, we were turning the little mill in two hands. Thus, flour and grouts had appeared, and we were able to make soup, kasha and pancakes even though with salt we had the same problem as with sugar. It was the third year of the war.
  My daughter Ella Romm wrote about this in one of her poetry (translated from Russian into English by her husband Michael Romm):
  
  With her husband at the front, she has to provide for the kids...
  Bringing seeds from the barn may put her to jail,
  But how else would mother feed us, her children?
  She is breaking her head over this.
  
  Mother works hard every day,
  She leaves for the grain barn in the morning.
  - Anya, put on your husband"s pants,
  How else would you go to work?
  
  That is what the peasant women said,
  And mother did understand.
  She put on her husband"s pants
  Before going to the grain barn.
  
  She skillfully tucked the pants into her woolen socks
  So that a single seed would not be spilt.
  Mother brings home the seeds.
  Mother is saving us.
  
  April 21, 2010
  
  When I think about the miracles that accompanied our family during the 5 years of the war, it seems that a supernatural power had saved my father and Uncle David. Who knows what could have happened to them if they were not sent to Siberia. Because of the arrest and imprisonment they, been Jews, avoided the German occupation. On the other hand, they could easily die in Siberia because those real criminals who were sentenced not for political reasons often were shot on the spot in the camps and prisons so they would not collaborate with the enemy. Ironically, my father was speared because he was an "enemy of the people".
  
  The earliest existing photo of Yuliy Vaysman at his school age
  Kopel Vaysman Family War Ordeal (from Yuliy Vaysman"s memoirs)
  At the beginning of the war, Aunt Rosa (the first wife of Kopel Vaysman) was forced into the Kishinev ghetto with her eight-year-old daughter Tanya. Tanya was brutally murdered there by a Nazi solder who smashed her head against the wall. Rosa survived with help of an elderly doctor who was working in the ghetto. After the war, Rosa did not come back to her husband Kopel and instead married that doctor out of her sense of duty and perhaps unable to face the tragic death of their only child. After the war, Rosa and her husband were deported to Siberia as ghetto survivors and, as such, untrustworthy to the Soviets. Their son, born in Siberia, died in infancy.
  
  During the war, Kopel, served in Iran, where Soviet and British troops occupied the northern part of the country and carried out the transport corridor through the Lend-Lease. I remember him in an enviable American leather coat upon his return to Kishinev after the war.
  
  In 1944, Kopel was able to find us in Northern Kazakhstan through the Buguruslan office for the refugees. Moreover, he miraculously found the addresses of his brothers serving time in Siberia (as political prisoners), and we, being in the North Kazakhstan area, received a long-awaited letter from my father. The great fortune of our family was that one of the brothers remained free and brought everybody back together.
  
  Motl Vaysman family War Ordeal (from the phone interview with Motl"s son Shneir Vaisman, by Ella Romm, 2012)
  There were five sons in Motl Vaysman"s family: Gersh, Shneir, Elik, Wolf, and Shmil. At the beginning of the World War II, the family tried to flee from Kishinev amongst other refugees. Motl"s wife Shendle was killed by a bombardment at the rail station Gornaya (near Rostov-on-Don). Motl and his youngest son Shmil did not survive the harsh conditions of evacuation. Wolf was taken to serve in the army and killed in a battle. He just turned 18. After the death of their parents, Shneir (Alexander) and his brother Elik were sent to different orphanages. Later Shneir was adapted and raised by the family of Russian doctors, Maria and Alexander Zhukov, who had lost their own child. Shneir and his new family continued their relationship even after his immigrated to Israel in 1999. The fate of Elik, who was 6 years old at the time of separation, still remains unknown. Motl"s oldest son Gersh served in the Soviet Army as an assistant to the chief of the repair services. It was a position that kept him away from the active combat and perhaps saved his life. (He received his basic technical education in a Romanian lyceum.) Gersh did not know that Shneir was alive and found him only ten years after the war.
  
  Kamisher family War Ordeal (from the phone interview with Elik Kamisher, by Ella Romm, 2012)
  In the beginning of the World War II Kamisher family, Abram, his wife Tzilya, two sons Ilyusha, Velvel and daughter Shprintsa left Kishinev along with many other refugees. In Krasnodar (station Kononovo), Abram was drafted to serve in the Soviet Army and sent to Makhachkala. The rest of the family moved to Krasnovodsk and later to Uzbekistan (Namangan region, Khakkulobad). The older son Elik worked in Kyzylorda (Kazakhstan) to support his family. In 1943, his mother Tzilya died in surgery of cyst removal in a hospital in the city of Andizhan. At the same time, Velvel caught malaria and Elik brought him to a hospital in Kyzylorda, while Shprintsa was taken to an orphanage. Then Elik was drafted to the Soviet Army (1943). He tried to convince the authorities that he cannot leave his younger siblings alone, but was told not to worry, because the Soviet Government will take a good care of them. He never saw his brother and sister again. All his life he tried to learn anything about their fate but with no luck.
  
  
  
  Chapter 4. Family Statistics
  
  Statistics in this chapter need to be viewed in the context of my research that included only the blood relatives I was able to find. The branches of Rosya, Mendel and Gersh have the most complete stats because I was able to gather data on all or almost all people. However, the branches of Hoskel, Azriel, and our earlier ancestors starting with Abram, do not have good enough sampling for statistical analysis because there are some missing pieces in their data. All graphs were created in 2013.
  
  Birth Statistics
  
  
  This graph shows that we have about the same number man and women in the family tree.
  
  However, the graph below illustrates that there were more boys born in the 19th century, while the 20th century gave us an even distribution between boys" and girls" births. Finally, the number of girls prevails so far in the 21st century.
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  Indeed, in the past we had more man than women, so there are more deceased man than women. Amongst the living people women are prevailing in our family, according to this graph.
  
  Boys birth peak in the month of December, then go down sharply in January. As for the girls, they preferred entering this world in February and disliked January and April the most.
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  Lively Statistics
  Almost a half of the people living now are our youth (up to 25 years old).
  
  In spite of having more living women than men, our man lived a little longer on average. This is due to the high mortality rate of the middle age women (around 50 years old).
  
  Living Distribution by Age
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  Average Longevity (Years Lived)
  by Gender
  
  
  
  
  As we see, the average life span between all our men was just over 75 years, while it was a year and a half less for the women. This is sharply contrasting with the general statistics.
  
  
  This graph adds to the picture showing the longevity distribution by the number of years lived.
  
  Our longevity record holders for both men and women were Hoskel"s descendants:
  Shmiel Vaysman, 98 years (1910-2009),
  Marusie Vaysman (Star), 99 years (1900-2000)
  
  
  The other long-livers who died older than 80 were:
  Elik Kamisher, 91 years old (Gersh"s descendant)
  David Vaysman, 87 years old (Mendel"s descendant)
  Gersh Vaysman, 85 years old (Gersh"s descendant)
  Volf (Volodya) Vaysman, 84 years old (Gersh"s descendant)
  Pinchas Vaysman, 81 years old (Azriel"s descendant)
  
  Marucie Vaysman (Star), 99 years old (Hoskel"s descendant)
  Chana (Anna) Vaysman (Glass), 92 years old, (Hoskel"s descendant)
  Kenya Trachtman (Potashnik), 91 years old (Rosya"s descendant)
  Raya Koyfman (Trachtman), 89 years old (Gersh"s descendant)
  
  As of October 31, 2019, the oldest living people are:
  
  Ester Vaysman (Koyfman), 95 years old (Gersh"s descendant)
  Yuliy Vaysman, 90 years old (Mendel"s descendant)
  Simon Froimovici, 87 years old (Hoskel descendant)
  Shneir Vaysman, 86 years old (Gersh"s descendant)
  Kenya Vaysman (Shpolyanski), 92 years old (Gersh"s descendant)
  Jennie Star (Waldman), 89 years old (Hoskel descendant)
  Stella Trachtman (Kanchik), 87 years old (Rosya"s descendant)
  
  Statistics of Death
  
  Even though I have only partial data about causes and dates of death in the family, the pattern of change over time is clear. Amongst the ten known people born between 1780 and 1850, four died young from childhood deceases. The children mortally rate was high at the end of the 18th and beginning of the 19th centuries. It remains unknown how the other six adults died and how long they lived. The lifespan at that time rarely exceeded 60 years. Even though I do not have any documentary proof, based on my calculations and other relatives" memories, our direct ancestor Eliahu Vaysman"s life lasted as long as 83 years.
  
  These charts highlight the comparative causation of death in the 20th and 21st centuries.
  
  
  Death Cause, 20th Century
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  Death Cause, 21st Century
  
  
  
  Marriage and Procreation Statistics
  
  Marriage Status as of 2012
  
  
  
  
  
  Children and married adults are the prevailing groups amongst the living family members.
  
  The following two charts show how the parents born in the 19th century had more children than the parents born in the 20th century. Lower overall birth rates and the World War II were the major factors.
  
  Children Counts for the Parents Born in the 19th Century
  
  
  
  
  
  Children Counts for the Parents Born in the 20th Century
  
  
  The record keepers in the number of children (including those who died early) are Hoskel Vaysman in the past, (9 children) and Shai Ben Zeev (Rosya"s descendant) nowadays (6 children).
  
  This graph represents the numbers of the known descendants of the five Vaysmans" branches. Notice Velvel"s branch is missing here because there is no certainty about his descendants.
  
  
  
  
  Afterword
  Reunion in HodHaSharon, Israel on October 26, 2012
  
  In 2012, I finished working on my book about the Vaysman family and started to plan a family reunion to meet people from my family tree. Because most of them lived in Israel, we chose HodHaSharon where a welcoming family of Rosita and Adir Glukman opened their home for us. Around the same time, two other families from the Americas happened to be in Israel. Ruth Vaysman from Argentina was visiting the Holy Land from to attend a cousin"s wedding, while Annette Lustgarten from Arizona, USA, was vacationing there. We expected around 30 people to join us on the reunion event, but suddenly over 70 came. Originally, we planned to meet outdoors but the weather turned bad at the last moment, and our hosts managed to rent out a large room in a close-by café.
  
  I brought a 7-meters-long paper roll with me from San Diego, depicting the nine generations of Abram Vayman"s descendants. It included all those people that came to the gathering. There was a lot of excitement around the tree depiction hung on a long wall, as well as between the newly met individuals and those who had not seen each other for a very long time. There were many children, adults and grandparents, including a 98-years old grate-grandmother from Argentina named Helena. We formed good relationships with a number of those families and have maintained it since then. The photos from our reunion can be viewed on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ellaromm/media_set?set=a.452344451473648&type=3
  
  Now, I am working on the second edition of the book with new discoveries and corrections, preparing for a trip to Argentina where many relatives live.
  
  
  
  The Final Thoughts
  
  Studying the family history is a never-ending adventure. We could dig further into the past and possibly discover more and more names and fact, or keep track of the ongoing events trying to catch up with the ongoing changes. I hope my work will inspire those who care about their family research and touch others with the insights of their ancestry.
  
  I am thankful to you for reading this book and caring about our Jewish heritage.
  
  Very truly yours,
  
  Ella Romm
  
  
  
  
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Э.Бланк "Пленница чужого мира" О.Копылова "Невеста звездного принца" А.Позин "Меч Тамерлана.Крестьянский сын,дворянская дочь"

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